HIST 690 (02) - Seminar: Historical Expl

Seminar: Historical Expl

Durham   Liberal Arts :: History
Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2024 - Full Term (08/26/2024 - 12/09/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   17  
CRN: 16683
Seminar in one of the fields listed below: A) American History, B) Atlantic History, C) Canadian History, D) Latin American History, E) Medieval History, F) European History, G) History of Islam, H) Ancient History, I) East Asian History, J) African History, K) Middle Eastern History, L) Historiography, M) Russian History, N) World History, O) British History, P) New Hampshire History, Q) Historical Methodology, R) Irish History, S) History of Science, T) Maritime History, U) Museum Studies. Course meets the History requirements for Group I, II, or III, depending on the topic. May be repeated barring duplication of subject.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.
Equivalent(s): HIST 701
Cross listed with : HIST 890.02
Instructors: Addis Mason

Times & Locations

Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2024 12/9/2024 M 2:30pm - 4:30pm MURK 203
Additional Course Details: 

THE RISE & FALL OF THE SOVIET EMPIRE: RUSSIA & THE SOVIET UNION IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

The Soviet Union cast a long shadow over the twentieth century. As the first modern socialist state, it inspired (and terrified) women and men from all over the world as a model for a new type of socialist state and society. Even today, over twenty years after the fall of communism in Eastern Europe, peoples within the former Soviet Empire and its satellite states are attempting to come to terms with its legacy. Moreover many of the tensions of contemporary global politics have deep roots in the relentless global competition between the United States and the Soviet Union known as “the Cold War.” This course will examine the rise and fall of the Soviet Union from its emergence out of the crucible of war and revolution in early twentieth-century Russia through the formation of the Soviet Union in 1922, and its ultimate disintegration in 1991. Particular attention will be paid to the following questions: What did “the Soviet experiment” mean for those who participated in it? In what ways was this experiment rooted in broader trends in Russian and European history and to what extent was it unique? How and to what extent did the Soviet state and society change over time? Finally, what is its legacy for Russia and the world? Crucial themes for the course include: the relationship between state and society; the relationship between federal, national, regional, religious and ethnic identity; the influence of the concepts of race, gender, and class; state- and empirebuilding; the influence of Bolshevik ideology and realpolitik; and Russia’s complex relationship between the ideas of “the West” and “the East.” The goal of the course is both to provide a basic introduction to the major events, personages, and periods of revolutionary Russian and Soviet history and to provide a framework for understanding the legacy of the “Soviet experiment.”

Booklist

Book Details
RUSSIA+RUSSIANS (2ND 11)
by HOSKING
Required
ISBN
978067406195 8
PUBLISHER
TRILITERAL
STRUCTURE OF SOVIET HISTORY (2ND 14)
by SUNY
Required
ISBN
978019534054 9
PUBLISHER
OXF
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