Timeroom: Fall 2020

Displaying 61 - 70 of 164 Results for: Level = All Undergraduate; Attributes = All Discovery Courses,Inquiry (Discovery)
Durham   Life Sciences & Agriculture > Biology

BIOL 444A (01) - Biotechnology and Society

Biotechnology & Society

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   24  
CRN: 13679
The history and science of biotechnology and genetic engineering of bacteria, plants, and animals including humans. Applications of DNA technology, cloning and genetic engineering to agriculture, biomedicine, industrial products, and environmental problems. Discussion of economic, social, environmental, legal, and ethical issues related to the applications of biotechnology and genetic engineering.
Section Comments: Open only to new freshman in June. Continuing students who will be freshmen or sophomores in the fall may register when Webcat registration re-opens in mid-July.
Mutual Exclusion : BIOT 422, BSCI 422
Only listed classes in section: Freshman
Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery), Environment,Tech&Society(Disc)
Instructors: Subhash Minocha
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 TR 9:40am - 11:00am RUDMAN G89
Durham   Life Sciences & Agriculture > Biology

BIOL 544 (01) - Your Genes, Your Life

Your Genes, Your Life

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 14639
How do mutations accumulate to cause cancer? How does genetic variation underlie evolution? This course examines technological advances to read your DNA sequence, your genome, and how the genome can be modified by gene-editing. Students deliberate ethics underlying gene therapy, improving immune therapy, and modifying human embryos. The course uses an inquiry approach to illuminate how knowing your genome predicts some aspects of your life, but other features depend on genome interaction with your environment.
Equivalent(s): BIOL 404, BIOL 444A
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course, Inquiry (Discovery), Environment,Tech&Society(Disc)
Instructors: Subhash Minocha
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm SLS 220
Durham   Engineering&Physical Sciences > Civil&Environmental Engnrng

CEE 400 (01) - Introduction to Civil Engineering

Intro to Civil Engineering

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 14127
Introduction to the civil engineering profession: structural, geotechnical, water resources, materials, and environmental. Overviews the civil project process including the creative design process, teamwork, bidding and construction. The relationship between civil engineering works and society including ethics, earthquakes, failures, successful signature structures, current events, and professional licensure. The production of professional engineering documents including writing tasks and calculations sets. Campus resources, the University system, and relationship between required curriculum, student objectives, and the civil engineering profession. Introduction to spreadsheet software, data analysis, and probability and statistics.
Equivalent(s): CIE 402
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Only listed classes in section: Freshman, Sophomore
Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery), Environment,Tech&Society(Disc)
Instructors: Raymond Cook
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 MWF 10:10am - 11:00am HS 150
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 M 1:10pm - 2:00pm KING N129
Durham   Engineering&Physical Sciences > Civil&Environmental Engnrng

CEE 400 (02) - Introduction to Civil Engineering

Intro to Civil Engineering

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 14128
Introduction to the civil engineering profession: structural, geotechnical, water resources, materials, and environmental. Overviews the civil project process including the creative design process, teamwork, bidding and construction. The relationship between civil engineering works and society including ethics, earthquakes, failures, successful signature structures, current events, and professional licensure. The production of professional engineering documents including writing tasks and calculations sets. Campus resources, the University system, and relationship between required curriculum, student objectives, and the civil engineering profession. Introduction to spreadsheet software, data analysis, and probability and statistics.
Equivalent(s): CIE 402
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Only listed classes in section: Freshman, Sophomore
Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery), Environment,Tech&Society(Disc)
Instructors: Raymond Cook
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 MWF 10:10am - 11:00am HS 150
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 M 2:10pm - 3:00pm DEM 251
Durham   Engineering&Physical Sciences > Civil&Environmental Engnrng

CEE 400 (03) - Introduction to Civil Engineering

Intro to Civil Engineering

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 14129
Introduction to the civil engineering profession: structural, geotechnical, water resources, materials, and environmental. Overviews the civil project process including the creative design process, teamwork, bidding and construction. The relationship between civil engineering works and society including ethics, earthquakes, failures, successful signature structures, current events, and professional licensure. The production of professional engineering documents including writing tasks and calculations sets. Campus resources, the University system, and relationship between required curriculum, student objectives, and the civil engineering profession. Introduction to spreadsheet software, data analysis, and probability and statistics.
Equivalent(s): CIE 402
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Only listed classes in section: Freshman, Sophomore
Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery), Environment,Tech&Society(Disc)
Instructors: Raymond Cook
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 MWF 10:10am - 11:00am HS 150
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 M 3:10pm - 4:00pm KING N310
Durham   Engineering&Physical Sciences > Civil&Environmental Engnrng

CEE 400 (04) - Introduction to Civil Engineering

Intro to Civil Engineering

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 14130
Introduction to the civil engineering profession: structural, geotechnical, water resources, materials, and environmental. Overviews the civil project process including the creative design process, teamwork, bidding and construction. The relationship between civil engineering works and society including ethics, earthquakes, failures, successful signature structures, current events, and professional licensure. The production of professional engineering documents including writing tasks and calculations sets. Campus resources, the University system, and relationship between required curriculum, student objectives, and the civil engineering profession. Introduction to spreadsheet software, data analysis, and probability and statistics.
Equivalent(s): CIE 402
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Only listed classes in section: Freshman, Sophomore
Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery), Environment,Tech&Society(Disc)
Instructors: Raymond Cook
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 MWF 10:10am - 11:00am HS 150
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 M 4:10pm - 5:00pm KING N129
Durham   Liberal Arts > Classics

CLAS 444D (01) - Athens, Rome, and the Birth of the United States

Athens, Rome and Birth of USA

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   21  
CRN: 16368
What did Washington, Jefferson, Adams (John and Abigail), Madison and Paine have in common? They were all instrumental in shaping the US political system, but they were also educated in the classics. When building the framework of our democratic republic, they continually looked to Athens and Rome as models, inspirations and warnings. The course examines ancient political systems and how they helped fashion our founder's notion of the ideal government and continue to do so.
Only listed classes in section: Freshman
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course, Inquiry (Discovery), Historical Perspectives(Disc)
Instructors: STAFF
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 MW 2:10pm - 3:30pm MURK 118

CMN 504 (01) - Introduction to Argumentation

Introduction to Argumentation

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 14549
Persuasive discourse as inquiry and advocacy grounded in practical inductive and deductive reasoning. Discovery, analysis, and testing of practical arguments. The nature and function of proof. Some emphasis on applied presentation. Prereq: CMN 456 with C or better, or by permission. Writing intensive.
Prerequisite(s):
Equivalent(s): CMN 404
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Only listed majors in section: CMN:BUSAPPL, CMN:MEDIA, COMMUNICATION
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course, Inquiry (Discovery)
Instructors: James Farrell
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm HORT 115
Additional Course Details: 

CMN-504 

Introduction to Argumentation

Professor Farrell

 

The course will introduce you to the study of argument.  You will learn how to recognize, understand, appraise, and respond to a variety of arguments.  You will also learn to construct a variety of arguments that will meet established public and academic standards of rationality.  This is a rigorous course that will demand that you think carefully and clearly.  Standards of formal logic and practical rationality seldom allow for laziness of thought and expression.  You will also find that the course is good exercise for your brain and will establish habits of thinking and writing that will prove valuable not only in other academic work, but in your professional and civic lives as well.

Our American legal and political system is based on public argument. Decision-making in both law and public policy results from an adversarial process in which two or more sides advance claims and support those claims with reasons and evidence.  One of the skills required for competent citizenship in a participatory democracy, then, is the ability to argue—to be able to articulate your position on issues of public importance, and to affirm the reasons for holding that view in a way that is convincing to others.  This course will set you on the path toward achieving that aspect of your civic competence.  Indeed, you should undertake the study of argumentation as part of your citizenship training.

            In addition, virtually all scholarly writing requires that you argue.  Whether you are doing work in media criticism, history of public address, conversational analysis, or some other discipline including history, philosophy, psychology, physics, or literature, you will be required to advance an interpretive claim, historical thesis, or scientific hypothesis, and then offer reasons and evidence to support your position.  Being a successful scholar requires that you understand how to read academic arguments, and how to argue in support of your own positions.

            The work for the course demands regular sustained attention.  Students are most successful when they keep up with the homework assignments conscientiously.  Only regular practice in analysis and composition will ensure that your own thinking and arguing will meet the highest standards for clear and strong public argument.

CMN 504 (02) - Introduction to Argumentation

Introduction to Argumentation

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   5  
CRN: 14550
Persuasive discourse as inquiry and advocacy grounded in practical inductive and deductive reasoning. Discovery, analysis, and testing of practical arguments. The nature and function of proof. Some emphasis on applied presentation. Prereq: CMN 456 with C or better, or by permission. Writing intensive.
Prerequisite(s):
Equivalent(s): CMN 404
Majors not allowed in section: CMN:BUSAPPL, CMN:MEDIA, COMMUNICATION
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course, Inquiry (Discovery)
Instructors: James Farrell
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm HORT 115
Additional Course Details: 

CMN-504 

Introduction to Argumentation

Professor Farrell

 

The course will introduce you to the study of argument.  You will learn how to recognize, understand, appraise, and respond to a variety of arguments.  You will also learn to construct a variety of arguments that will meet established public and academic standards of rationality.  This is a rigorous course that will demand that you think carefully and clearly.  Standards of formal logic and practical rationality seldom allow for laziness of thought and expression.  You will also find that the course is good exercise for your brain and will establish habits of thinking and writing that will prove valuable not only in other academic work, but in your professional and civic lives as well.

Our American legal and political system is based on public argument. Decision-making in both law and public policy results from an adversarial process in which two or more sides advance claims and support those claims with reasons and evidence.  One of the skills required for competent citizenship in a participatory democracy, then, is the ability to argue—to be able to articulate your position on issues of public importance, and to affirm the reasons for holding that view in a way that is convincing to others.  This course will set you on the path toward achieving that aspect of your civic competence.  Indeed, you should undertake the study of argumentation as part of your citizenship training.

            In addition, virtually all scholarly writing requires that you argue.  Whether you are doing work in media criticism, history of public address, conversational analysis, or some other discipline including history, philosophy, psychology, physics, or literature, you will be required to advance an interpretive claim, historical thesis, or scientific hypothesis, and then offer reasons and evidence to support your position.  Being a successful scholar requires that you understand how to read academic arguments, and how to argue in support of your own positions.

            The work for the course demands regular sustained attention.  Students are most successful when they keep up with the homework assignments conscientiously.  Only regular practice in analysis and composition will ensure that your own thinking and arguing will meet the highest standards for clear and strong public argument.

CMN 507 (01) - Introduction to Rhetorical Theory and Analysis

Intro Rhetorical Thry&Analysis

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 14018
Major precepts of rhetorical theory. Application of those precepts in analysis and understanding of a wide range of human communication. Consideration of how precepts and issues of rhetorical theory apply to contemporary issues and problems. Prereq: CMN 456 with C or better, or by permission.
Prerequisite(s):
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Only listed majors in section: CMN:BUSAPPL, CMN:MEDIA, COMMUNICATION
Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery)
Instructors: Michelle Gibbons
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 MWF 9:10am - 10:00am HORT 201
Additional Course Details: