Timeroom: Spring 2018

Displaying 1 - 10 of 19 Results for: Subject = ANTH

ANTH 411 (01) - Global Perspectives on the Human Condition: An Introduction to Anthropology

Global Perspectives:Intro Anth

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2018 - Full Term (01/23/2018 - 05/07/2018)
Class Size:   150  
CRN: 50081
By providing a global perspective on the human experience, this course helps us think about the issues that confront students as citizens of the world. Gleaning lessons from cultures past and present this course examines what it means to be human. Whether humans are violent or peace-loving, egalitarian or hierarchical is linked to specific ways of life, rather than reflecting a fixed human nature. The course examines the economic, political, and social forces that shape human behavior and the global forces that people around the world currently confront. From an anthropological perspective it addresses pressing social issues such as sustainable development, hunger and poverty, population growth, religion and changing world views, racism, urbanization, co modification, and movements for social co modification, and movements for social justice.
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery), Foreign Culture GP 5
Instructors: Sara Withers
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/23/2018 5/7/2018 TR 9:40am - 11:00am MUB TH2

ANTH 411 (02) - Global Perspectives on the Human Condition: An Introduction to Anthropology

Global Perspectives:Intro Anth

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2018 - Full Term (01/23/2018 - 05/07/2018)
Class Size:   150  
CRN: 50403
By providing a global perspective on the human experience, this course helps us think about the issues that confront students as citizens of the world. Gleaning lessons from cultures past and present this course examines what it means to be human. Whether humans are violent or peace-loving, egalitarian or hierarchical is linked to specific ways of life, rather than reflecting a fixed human nature. The course examines the economic, political, and social forces that shape human behavior and the global forces that people around the world currently confront. From an anthropological perspective it addresses pressing social issues such as sustainable development, hunger and poverty, population growth, religion and changing world views, racism, urbanization, co modification, and movements for social co modification, and movements for social justice.
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery), Foreign Culture GP 5
Instructors: Sara Withers
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/23/2018 5/7/2018 TR 11:10am - 12:30pm MUB TH2

ANTH 411 (03) - Global Perspectives on the Human Condition: An Introduction to Anthropology

Global Perspectives:Intro Anth

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2018 - Full Term (01/23/2018 - 05/07/2018)
Class Size:   150  
CRN: 51657
By providing a global perspective on the human experience, this course helps us think about the issues that confront students as citizens of the world. Gleaning lessons from cultures past and present this course examines what it means to be human. Whether humans are violent or peace-loving, egalitarian or hierarchical is linked to specific ways of life, rather than reflecting a fixed human nature. The course examines the economic, political, and social forces that shape human behavior and the global forces that people around the world currently confront. From an anthropological perspective it addresses pressing social issues such as sustainable development, hunger and poverty, population growth, religion and changing world views, racism, urbanization, co modification, and movements for social co modification, and movements for social justice.
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery), Foreign Culture GP 5
Instructors: Marieka Brouwer Burg
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/23/2018 5/7/2018 TR 11:10am - 12:30pm DEM 112

ANTH 411 (04) - Global Perspectives on the Human Condition: An Introduction to Anthropology

Global Perspectives:Intro Anth

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2018 - Full Term (01/23/2018 - 05/07/2018)
Class Size:   150  
CRN: 51847
By providing a global perspective on the human experience, this course helps us think about the issues that confront students as citizens of the world. Gleaning lessons from cultures past and present this course examines what it means to be human. Whether humans are violent or peace-loving, egalitarian or hierarchical is linked to specific ways of life, rather than reflecting a fixed human nature. The course examines the economic, political, and social forces that shape human behavior and the global forces that people around the world currently confront. From an anthropological perspective it addresses pressing social issues such as sustainable development, hunger and poverty, population growth, religion and changing world views, racism, urbanization, co modification, and movements for social co modification, and movements for social justice.
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery), Foreign Culture GP 5
Instructors: Smita Lahiri
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/23/2018 5/7/2018 TR 9:40am - 11:00am DEM 112

ANTH 411W (M1) - Global Perspectives on the Human Condition: An Introduction to Anthropology

Global Perspectives:Intro Anth

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2018 - UNHM Credit (15 weeks) (01/25/2018 - 05/10/2018)
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 54891
By providing a global perspective on the human experience, this course helps us think about the issues that confront students as citizens of the world. Gleaning lessons from cultures past and present this course examines what it means to be human. Whether humans are violent or peace-loving, egalitarian or hierarchical is linked to specific ways of life, rather than reflecting a fixed human nature. The course examines the economic, political, and social forces that shape human behavior and the global forces that people around the world currently confront. From an anthropological perspective it addresses pressing social issues such as sustainable development, hunger and poverty, population growth, religion and changing world views, racism, urbanization, co modification, and movements for social co modification, and movements for social justice. Writing intensive.
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course, World Cultures(Discovery), Foreign Culture GP 5
Instructors: Kurt Springs
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/25/2018 5/10/2018 R 1:01pm - 3:50pm PANDRA P102

ANTH 411W (M2) - Global Perspectives on the Human Condition: An Introduction to Anthropology

Global Perspectives:Intro Anth

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2018 - UNHM Credit (15 weeks) (01/25/2018 - 05/10/2018)
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 54892
By providing a global perspective on the human experience, this course helps us think about the issues that confront students as citizens of the world. Gleaning lessons from cultures past and present this course examines what it means to be human. Whether humans are violent or peace-loving, egalitarian or hierarchical is linked to specific ways of life, rather than reflecting a fixed human nature. The course examines the economic, political, and social forces that shape human behavior and the global forces that people around the world currently confront. From an anthropological perspective it addresses pressing social issues such as sustainable development, hunger and poverty, population growth, religion and changing world views, racism, urbanization, co modification, and movements for social co modification, and movements for social justice. Writing intensive.
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course, World Cultures(Discovery), Foreign Culture GP 5
Instructors: Kurt Springs
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/25/2018 5/10/2018 R 6:01pm - 9:00pm PANDRA P301

ANTH 412 (01) - Broken Pots and Buried Cities: Adventures in Archaeology

Adventures in Archaeology

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2018 - Full Term (01/23/2018 - 05/07/2018)
Class Size:   60  
CRN: 55076
Traces the history of archaeology's most spectacular finds and how those moments of adventure and glory developed into a scientific discipline. Provides an introduction to the methods used by archaeologists to recover, analyze, and interpret data in their ongoing effort to understand humanity through the analysis of those small things left behind.
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: Social Science (Discovery), Social Science GP 7
Instructors: Marieka Brouwer Burg
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/23/2018 5/7/2018 TR 3:40pm - 5:00pm HORT 204

ANTH 415 (01) - The Human Story: Evolution, Fossils and DNA

Human Evolution, Fossils & DNA

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2018 - Full Term (01/23/2018 - 05/07/2018)
Class Size:   100  
CRN: 55077
This course uses an evolutionary approach to investigate human biological and bio-cultural variation in time and space. Through a study of the basics of population genetics, an evaluation of our closest living relatives, nonhuman primates, and an exploration of the biological and cultural pathways traversed by our ancestors to become modern Homo sapiens, students learn the depth and complexity of the human story. Laboratory exercises dealing with human genetics, hominin fossils, and evolution are integrated with lectures to give students hands-on learning experience. No credit earned if credit received for ANTH 413.
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: Biological Science GP 3B, Biological Science(Discovery)
Instructors: Rebecca Gibson
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/23/2018 5/7/2018 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm HS 205

ANTH 440B (H01) - Honors/Saving Culture: Heritage Management

Honors/Saving Culture

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2018 - Full Term (01/23/2018 - 05/07/2018)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 57082
Culture and heritage are increasingly important topics for scholars, art connoisseurs, politicians, and the public alike. The Taj Mahal in India is the UNESCO world heritage site, but is yoga that many around the world engage in? Who decides what heritage is and what counts as culture? How do these decisions impact peoples? daily lives? The course introduces students to the concept of cultural heritage and how it ?works? in complex, non-universal ways.
Course restricted to members of the University Honors Program. UHP members should use the preregistration form before attempting to register.
Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery), Honors course, Foreign Culture GP 5
Instructors: Svetlana Peshkova
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/23/2018 5/7/2018 TR 11:10am - 12:30pm NHH G44

ANTH 500 (D01) - Peoples and Cultures of the World

PeoplesCultures:Sub-Sah Africa

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2018 - Full Term (01/23/2018 - 05/07/2018)
Class Size:   35  
CRN: 52600
A) North America; B) South America; C) Middle East and North Africa; D) Sub-Saharan Africa; E) Asia; F) Oceania; G) Caribbean; Z) Other. Characteristic ecological, historical, and socio-cultural factors in the major ethnographic regions of the globe. Analysis of selected societies and institutions. Offered in the following sections as staff is available and student needs dictate. North America: Study of the economy, society, religion, art, and ideas of North American Indians from pre-colonial times to the present. South America: A survey of the indigenous cultures and selected studies of the relationship between environment and culture. Changes in culture and social organizations since the 16th century will be considered where historical data permit. Middle East and North Africa: The role of ecological, social, cultural, and historical factors in shaping Middle Eastern and North African culture today. Special attention will be paid to family, values, and religion; to nomadic, village, and urban ways of life; and to issues of unity, diversity, colonialism, and culture change. Sub-Saharan Africa: Study of Sub-Saharan economy, society, and culture from pre-colonial times to the present. South Asia: Emphasis on India, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. Traditional and changing South Asian cultures, including caste, family, economy, and religious traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism. Southeast Asia: Geographical, historical, ethnic, and socio-cultural factors characteristic of the region. Impact of Indian, Chinese, Islamic, and European civilizations. Analysis of selected indigenous social, political, economic, and religious institutions. Oceania: Study of the economy, society, religion, art, and ideology of Pacific Island cultures from pre-colonial times to the present. Caribbean: The history and contemporary situation of diverse cultures of the Caribbean are examined using ethnography, music, and film. The mixture of cultural roots from Africa, Europe, and Asia are investigated and the dynamic and fluid nature of these cultures is stressed. Race as an experience of oppression and resistance is discussed.
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery), Foreign Culture GP 5
Instructors: Casey Golomski
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/23/2018 5/7/2018 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm NHH G44