Timeroom: Fall 2017

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20 Results for: Subject = ANTH

ANTH 411 (01) - Global Perspectives on the Human Condition: An Introduction to Anthropology

Global Perspectives:Intro Anth

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2017 - Full Term (08/28/2017 - 12/08/2017)
Class Size:   165  
CRN: 10181
By providing a global perspective on the human experience, this course helps us think about the issues that confront students as citizens of the world. Gleaning lessons from cultures past and present this course examines what it means to be human. Whether humans are violent or peace-loving, egalitarian or hierarchical is linked to specific ways of life, rather than reflecting a fixed human nature. The course examines the economic, political, and social forces that shape human behavior and the global forces that people around the world currently confront. From an anthropological perspective it addresses pressing social issues such as sustainable development, hunger and poverty, population growth, religion and changing world views, racism, urbanization, co modification, and movements for social co modification, and movements for social justice.
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery), Foreign Culture GP 5
Instructors: Sara Withers
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/28/2017 12/8/2017 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm Hamilton Smith 210

ANTH 411 (02) - Global Perspectives on the Human Condition: An Introduction to Anthropology

Global Perspectives:Intro Anth

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2017 - Full Term (08/28/2017 - 12/08/2017)
Class Size:   165  
CRN: 10183
By providing a global perspective on the human experience, this course helps us think about the issues that confront students as citizens of the world. Gleaning lessons from cultures past and present this course examines what it means to be human. Whether humans are violent or peace-loving, egalitarian or hierarchical is linked to specific ways of life, rather than reflecting a fixed human nature. The course examines the economic, political, and social forces that shape human behavior and the global forces that people around the world currently confront. From an anthropological perspective it addresses pressing social issues such as sustainable development, hunger and poverty, population growth, religion and changing world views, racism, urbanization, co modification, and movements for social co modification, and movements for social justice.
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery), Foreign Culture GP 5
Instructors: Sara Withers
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/28/2017 12/8/2017 TR 9:40am - 11:00am Memorial Union Building TH2

ANTH 411 (03) - Global Perspectives on the Human Condition: An Introduction to Anthropology

Global Perspectives:Intro Anth

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2017 - Full Term (08/28/2017 - 12/08/2017)
Class Size:   165  
CRN: 12033
By providing a global perspective on the human experience, this course helps us think about the issues that confront students as citizens of the world. Gleaning lessons from cultures past and present this course examines what it means to be human. Whether humans are violent or peace-loving, egalitarian or hierarchical is linked to specific ways of life, rather than reflecting a fixed human nature. The course examines the economic, political, and social forces that shape human behavior and the global forces that people around the world currently confront. From an anthropological perspective it addresses pressing social issues such as sustainable development, hunger and poverty, population growth, religion and changing world views, racism, urbanization, co modification, and movements for social co modification, and movements for social justice.
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery), Foreign Culture GP 5
Instructors: Marieka Brouwer Burg
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/28/2017 12/8/2017 TR 11:10am - 12:30pm Memorial Union Building TH2

ANTH 411W (M2) - Global Perspectives on the Human Condition: An Introduction to Anthropology

Global Perspectives:Intro Anth

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2017 - UNHM Credit (15 weeks) (08/31/2017 - 12/14/2017)
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 15596
By providing a global perspective on the human experience, this course helps us think about the issues that confront students as citizens of the world. Gleaning lessons from cultures past and present this course examines what it means to be human. Whether humans are violent or peace-loving, egalitarian or hierarchical is linked to specific ways of life, rather than reflecting a fixed human nature. The course examines the economic, political, and social forces that shape human behavior and the global forces that people around the world currently confront. From an anthropological perspective it addresses pressing social issues such as sustainable development, hunger and poverty, population growth, religion and changing world views, racism, urbanization, co modification, and movements for social co modification, and movements for social justice. Writing intensive.
Additional Course Description: 

We will be using the Top Hat (www.tophat.com) classroom response system in class. You will be able to submit answers to in-class questions using Apple or Android smartphones and tablets, laptops, or through text message. Top Hat will require a paid subscription ($25 just for just our class), and a full breakdown of all subscription options available can be found here: www.tophat.com/pricing

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course, World Cultures(Discovery), Foreign Culture GP 5
Instructors: Kurt Springs
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2017 12/14/2017 R 6:01pm - 9:00pm Pandora Building (UNHM) P102

ANTH 412 (M1) - Broken Pots and Buried Cities: Adventures in Archaeology

Adventures in Archaeology

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2017 - UNHM Credit (15 weeks) (08/31/2017 - 12/14/2017)
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 16952
Traces the history of archaeology's most spectacular finds and how those moments of adventure and glory developed into a scientific discipline. Provides an introduction to the methods used by archaeologists to recover, analyze, and interpret data in their ongoing effort to understand humanity through the analysis of those small things left behind.
Additional Course Description: 

We will be using the Top Hat (www.tophat.com) classroom response system in class. You will be able to submit answers to in-class questions using Apple or Android smartphones and tablets, laptops, or through text message. Top Hat will require a paid subscription ($25 just for just our class), and a full breakdown of all subscription options available can be found here: www.tophat.com/pricing

Broken Pots and Buried Cities
Attributes: Social Science (Discovery), Social Science GP 7
Instructors: Kurt Springs
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2017 12/14/2017 R 1:01pm - 3:50pm Pandora Building (UNHM) P341

ANTH 415 (01) - The Human Story: Evolution, Fossils and DNA

Human Evolution, Fossils & DNA

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2017 - Full Term (08/28/2017 - 12/08/2017)
Class Size:   68  
CRN: 15201
This course uses an evolutionary approach to investigate human biological and bio-cultural variation in time and space. Through a study of the basics of population genetics, an evaluation of our closest living relatives, nonhuman primates, and an exploration of the biological and cultural pathways traversed by our ancestors to become modern Homo sapiens, students learn the depth and complexity of the human story. Laboratory exercises dealing with human genetics, hominin fossils, and evolution are integrated with lectures to give students hands-on learning experience. No credit earned if credit received for ANTH 413.
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: Biological Science GP 3B, Biological Science(Discovery)
Instructors: Rebecca Gibson
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/28/2017 12/8/2017 TR 9:40am - 11:00am Horton 307

ANTH 440A (H01) - Honors/Medicine and Culture: Science, Technology and the Body

Honors/Medicine & Culture

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2017 - Full Term (08/28/2017 - 12/08/2017)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 14776
This course takes a comparative, cross-cultural approach to global medicine. Through critical readings, multimedia presentations, class discussions, and expository writing, we consider how techno-scientific developments, transnational flows, environmental transformations, and historical inequities shape how we know and experience our bodies. Key course topics include controversies surrounding new medical technologies, the intersections between Western and non-Western medical systems, and innovative responses to chronic global diseases.
Course restricted to members of the University Honors Program. UHP members should use the preregistration form before attempting to register.
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: Honors course, Technology GP 3T, Environment,Tech&Society(Disc)
Instructors: Sara Withers
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/28/2017 12/8/2017 TR 11:10am - 12:30pm Memorial Union Building TH1

ANTH 450 (01) - Introduction to Race, Culture, and Power

Intro Race, Culture, and Power

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2017 - Full Term (08/28/2017 - 12/08/2017)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 15450
Race, culture, and power intersect at a social space where those in that space experience differing opportunities and access to social and economic privileges, resources, and power. This course explains the way race functions today as a social and cultural category to justify systematic inequality and differences in power and to obscure the functioning of the global economy. The course draws on emerging literature on Blackness, Whiteness, and Minorities and on analyses of the differential implementation of social welfare policies in the United States. (Also listed as INCO 450.)
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: Literature, Phil,& Ideas GP 8
Instructors: Justus Ogembo
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/28/2017 12/8/2017 TR 3:40pm - 5:00pm Horton 215

ANTH 500 (A01) - Peoples and Cultures of the World

Peoples & Cultures/N. America

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2017 - Full Term (08/28/2017 - 12/08/2017)
Class Size:   35  
CRN: 16427
A) North America; B) South America; C) Middle East and North Africa; D) Sub-Saharan Africa; E) Asia; F) Oceania; G) Caribbean; Z) Other. Characteristic ecological, historical, and socio-cultural factors in the major ethnographic regions of the globe. Analysis of selected societies and institutions. Offered in the following sections as staff is available and student needs dictate. North America: Study of the economy, society, religion, art, and ideas of North American Indians from pre-colonial times to the present. South America: A survey of the indigenous cultures and selected studies of the relationship between environment and culture. Changes in culture and social organizations since the 16th century will be considered where historical data permit. Middle East and North Africa: The role of ecological, social, cultural, and historical factors in shaping Middle Eastern and North African culture today. Special attention will be paid to family, values, and religion; to nomadic, village, and urban ways of life; and to issues of unity, diversity, colonialism, and culture change. Sub-Saharan Africa: Study of Sub-Saharan economy, society, and culture from pre-colonial times to the present. South Asia: Emphasis on India, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. Traditional and changing South Asian cultures, including caste, family, economy, and religious traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism. Southeast Asia: Geographical, historical, ethnic, and socio-cultural factors characteristic of the region. Impact of Indian, Chinese, Islamic, and European civilizations. Analysis of selected indigenous social, political, economic, and religious institutions. Oceania: Study of the economy, society, religion, art, and ideology of Pacific Island cultures from pre-colonial times to the present. Caribbean: The history and contemporary situation of diverse cultures of the Caribbean are examined using ethnography, music, and film. The mixture of cultural roots from Africa, Europe, and Asia are investigated and the dynamic and fluid nature of these cultures is stressed. Race as an experience of oppression and resistance is discussed.
Full Title - Peoples & Cultures: North America.
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery), Foreign Culture GP 5
Instructors: Meghan Howey
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/28/2017 12/8/2017 MW 9:40am - 11:00am McConnell 220

ANTH 500 (C01) - Peoples and Cultures of the World

Peoples & Cultures/Mid E&N Afr

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2017 - Full Term (08/28/2017 - 12/08/2017)
Class Size:   35  
CRN: 15451
A) North America; B) South America; C) Middle East and North Africa; D) Sub-Saharan Africa; E) Asia; F) Oceania; G) Caribbean; Z) Other. Characteristic ecological, historical, and socio-cultural factors in the major ethnographic regions of the globe. Analysis of selected societies and institutions. Offered in the following sections as staff is available and student needs dictate. North America: Study of the economy, society, religion, art, and ideas of North American Indians from pre-colonial times to the present. South America: A survey of the indigenous cultures and selected studies of the relationship between environment and culture. Changes in culture and social organizations since the 16th century will be considered where historical data permit. Middle East and North Africa: The role of ecological, social, cultural, and historical factors in shaping Middle Eastern and North African culture today. Special attention will be paid to family, values, and religion; to nomadic, village, and urban ways of life; and to issues of unity, diversity, colonialism, and culture change. Sub-Saharan Africa: Study of Sub-Saharan economy, society, and culture from pre-colonial times to the present. South Asia: Emphasis on India, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. Traditional and changing South Asian cultures, including caste, family, economy, and religious traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism. Southeast Asia: Geographical, historical, ethnic, and socio-cultural factors characteristic of the region. Impact of Indian, Chinese, Islamic, and European civilizations. Analysis of selected indigenous social, political, economic, and religious institutions. Oceania: Study of the economy, society, religion, art, and ideology of Pacific Island cultures from pre-colonial times to the present. Caribbean: The history and contemporary situation of diverse cultures of the Caribbean are examined using ethnography, music, and film. The mixture of cultural roots from Africa, Europe, and Asia are investigated and the dynamic and fluid nature of these cultures is stressed. Race as an experience of oppression and resistance is discussed.
Additional Course Description: 

Socio-cultural anthropology offers a unique approach to learning about the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), a fascinating and diverse place. By exploring daily lives of local peoples, students see beyond such cultural stereotypes as “violence” and “fanaticism;” they learn about and understand better regional history, socio-cultural diversity, and social effects of unique individual lives. The goal of this course is to introduce students to the regional socio-cultural diversity and history and challenge students’ assumptions about the region. The readings, presentations, and films discussing historical, political, geographic, ideological and socio-cultural environment in the region, and creative assignments will help us to achieve this goal. There are plenty of ways our global world links different peoples and histories by creating and transcending differentiation among individuals and groups. Lives of local individuals are unique in some ways; in other ways they resemble yours and mine. We will explore these differences and similarities in a critical and self-reflexive manner (e.g., reflecting on whether and how your opinion about an issue and understanding of the reading/film/presentation is affected by your socio-cultural context). Such approach will help to sample some social regularities, such as family and gender dynamics, both prevalent and contested in the region, and understand sources of diversity and tension that exist within the region as anthropologists think about them. 

(ANTH 500.C01) Full Title: Peoples & Cultures: Middle East/North Africa
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery), Foreign Culture GP 5
Instructors: Svetlana Peshkova
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/28/2017 12/8/2017 MW 11:10am - 12:30pm McConnell 245