Timeroom: Spring 2023

Displaying 51 - 60 of 131 Results for: Campus = Law

LGP 963 (01) - Law and Mental Health

Law and Mental Health

Credits: 2.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Law (01/17/2023 - 05/12/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   15  
CRN: 53288
This course equips students to manage all phases of legal proceedings in which mental health evidence and testimony are utilized. Students will review theories of law and mental health; assessment, treatment, credentialing, ethics, and practice standards; competency, sanity, and commitment proceedings; mental injury, antidiscrimination, and educational entitlements; delinquency, abuse/neglect, and child custody determinations; and practical aspects of forensic consultation, expert witness retention, and the lawyer?s own mental health.
Instructor Approval Required. Contact Instructor for permission then register through Webcat.
Majors not allowed in section: LAW: JD HYBRID
Excluding the following students: Graduate Law - Online
Instructors: Eric Drogin
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/11/2023 2/11/2023 S 9:00am - 4:00pm UNHL 202
1/17/2023 5/12/2023 M 5:30pm - 8:30pm UNHL 202

LGP 970 (01) - Preliminary Bar Exam

Preliminary Bar Exam

Credits: 0.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Law (01/17/2023 - 05/12/2023)
Grade Mode: Law Satisfactory/Unsatisfactry
Class Size:   300  
CRN: 52229
The preliminary bar exam is a requirement for all 1L students, as set forth in the Student Handbook p.53 The prelim will assess students' substantive knowledge of Torts, Contracts, Property, and Civil Procedure, as well as the essential skills necessary for success on the bar exam. Students will not receive course credit for the prelim, and it will not be used to calculate GPA or class rank.
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/17/2023 5/12/2023 Hours Arranged TBA

LGP 971 (01) - BioInnovation Research Collaboration and the Law

BioInnovation Resch Collaborat

Credits: 2.0 to 3.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Law (01/17/2023 - 05/12/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 52999
This course will explore the legal, regulatory and business issues that arise from the research, development, manufacturing and sale of innovative bio-medical products. Students will work through a case study to simulate the collaborative development of a product, learning in a dynamic and multi-disciplinary classroom. The curriculum will track key areas of the law that impact the development of innovative products, specifically cutting edge issues that arise when bringing together industry, academia and government collaboration around bio generation. Students will emerge from this pilot program ready for the challenge of identifying the issues facing companies working in bioinnovation space and specifically those companies seeking services from ARMI, Inc.
Only listed colleges in section: Graduate School, Law
Majors not allowed in section: LAW: JD HYBRID
Excluding the following students: Graduate Law - Online
Instructors: Bruce Leicher
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/17/2023 5/12/2023 R 5:30pm - 7:30pm UNHL 202

LGP 972 (01) - Valuation and the Law

Valuation and the Law

Credits: 1.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Law (01/17/2023 - 05/12/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   15  
CRN: 56617
Valuation is a prerequisite for thoughtful decision-making. The old management adage?you can?t manage what you don?t measure?remains true today. In business, sound decision-making involves placing reasonable values on assets and strategies to identify the best decisions among competing, but uncertain, choices. While valuation has long been used by businesses to improve decisions, it has been slow to develop as a wide-ranging decision tool in the legal setting. As a result, valuation principles are too often ignored or poorly implemented in legal settings. Valuation should be a fundamental skill possessed by most lawyers. Consider just a few of the legal settings that require valuation to make properly informed decisions: ? Developing remedies in the litigation context. ? Making sue-or-settle decisions. ? Crafting effective laws and regulations. ? Determining how much to spend on legal services. ? Developing and executing business strategies that are based on legal rights (such as intellectual property strategies). ? Evaluating the success or failure of negotiations. In each of these contexts, the decision-maker must make a value judgment (the option chosen is better than options not chosen), whether the decision-maker appreciates it or not. For example, when a client decides to settle a lawsuit, she has valued the settlement alternative higher than the litigation alternative. Therefore, the choice is not whether to employ a valuation analysis. Rather, the choice is whether to employ an intelligent valuation analysis that helps inform the decision or to employ a jumbled process that ignores such valuable information. One reason (and probably the most powerful reason) for the slow development of valuation analysis in the legal setting is the common misperception that valuation is too difficult. This course will seek to disprove that notion. This course will teach students how to apply valuation principles in their future legal practice and become more effective lawyers. Strong math skills are not required. We will not employ any mathematical concepts beyond what is required in a 6th grade math class.
Instructor Approval Required. Contact Instructor for permission then register through Webcat.
Majors not allowed in section: LAW: JD HYBRID
Instructors: John Orcutt
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/17/2023 5/12/2023 T 9:00am - 10:00am UNHL 274

LGP 973 (01) - Extended Bar Review

Extended Bar Review

Credits: 2.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Law (01/17/2023 - 05/12/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 56618
This course is designed to jumpstart your bar exam preparation by developing your substantive knowledge and sharpening your critical bar exam success skills. Specifically, you will receive in-depth review of highly tested topics in Contracts, Evidence, Torts and Real Property. You will then put that knowledge to use working through practice MBE and essay questions. You will learn how to develop a strong but flexible framework to resolve bar exam problems, sharpen your reading comprehension, issue identification, rule mastery, critical thinking and legal analysis skills.
Instructor Approval Required. Contact Instructor for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Kevin Frost
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/17/2023 5/12/2023 R 5:00pm - 7:00pm UNHL 205

LGP 973 (1LH) - Extended Bar Review

Extended Bar Review

Online Course Delivery Method: Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 3.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Law Hybrid (01/17/2023 - 05/12/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   50  
CRN: 55360
This course is designed to jumpstart your bar exam preparation by developing your substantive knowledge and sharpening your critical bar exam success skills. Specifically, you will receive in-depth review of highly tested topics in Contracts, Evidence, Torts and Real Property. You will then put that knowledge to use working through practice MBE and essay questions. You will learn how to develop a strong but flexible framework to resolve bar exam problems, sharpen your reading comprehension, issue identification, rule mastery, critical thinking and legal analysis skills.
Only listed majors in section: LAW: JD HYBRID
Instructors: STAFF
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/17/2023 5/12/2023 Hours Arranged ONLINE

LGP 979 (01) - Animal Law

Animal Law

Credits: 3.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Law (01/17/2023 - 05/12/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   24  
CRN: 53303
Animal law is the fastest developing field of law in the nation. It is an interdisciplinary practice, encompassing several areas of the law such as property, contracts, torts, constitutional law, criminal law, and even intellectual property. In addition, there are federal and state laws specific to animals, such as trusts and cruelty statutes. This class will focus upon both areas. There will be a strong emphasis on your communication skills: thoughtful and consistent class participation is required. Each week we will address a new area of law, and how it applies to animal law. Class one will be a review of the common law as it relates to animals; class two will be a case file or in class exercise based upon class one.
Instructor Approval Required. Contact Instructor for permission then register through Webcat.
Majors not allowed in section: LAW: JD HYBRID
Excluding the following students: Graduate Law - Online
Instructors: Patricia Morris
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/17/2023 5/12/2023 TR 12:30pm - 2:00pm UNHL 103

LGP 990 (01) - Law Special Topics

LawSpcTop/State Con Law

Credits: 2.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Law (01/17/2023 - 05/12/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 56557
Special topics courses explore emerging developments in the law or take advantage of special expertise provided by visitors and guest faculty. Courses offered under this title are approved by the Associate Dean and may be designated to meet skills or advanced writing requirements. Special topics classes may only satisfy elective credit and are available only to law students after their first year of study and graduate students by permission.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.
Majors not allowed in section: LAW: JD HYBRID
Instructors: Neals-Erik Delker
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/17/2023 5/12/2023 W 5:30pm - 7:30pm UNHL 274
Additional Course Details: 

State Constitutional Law

State constitutions provide a fertile source of law for a lawyer to advocate for a client’s rights.  For the criminal defendant the state constitution may provide broader protections in the area of criminal procedure.  For the prosecutor it is important to understand state court approaches to a interpreting the state constitution so that the prosecutor can respond effectively to efforts to impose broader protections under state constitutions than the federal courts recognize under the U.S. Constitution.  For the lawyer representing state or local government agencies, an understanding of state constitutional law is essential for the exercise of the government’s general police powers.  For the attorney representing a private individual against state action, the state constitution may provide rights or limit state power in ways not contained in the U.S. Constitution.  The state constitutions govern issues as broadly as labor relations, proportional taxation, and environmental law.  The goal of State Constitutional Law Seminar is to familiarize students with state constitutional law so that the student will consider this important source of law when representing clients. 

The course does not focus exclusively on any particular state’s constitution.  Rather, the course presents an overview of how the various state supreme courts address rights under their individual state constitutions.  Students can then adapt those concepts to the jurisdiction where the student will ultimately practice law.

LGP 990 (02) - Law Special Topics

LawSpcTop/Fed Indian Law

Credits: 3.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Law (01/17/2023 - 05/12/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 56558
Special topics courses explore emerging developments in the law or take advantage of special expertise provided by visitors and guest faculty. Courses offered under this title are approved by the Associate Dean and may be designated to meet skills or advanced writing requirements. Special topics classes may only satisfy elective credit and are available only to law students after their first year of study and graduate students by permission.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.
Majors not allowed in section: LAW: JD HYBRID
Instructors: Arthur Gajarsa
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/17/2023 5/12/2023 TR 12:30pm - 2:00pm UNHL 274
Additional Course Details: 

Federal Indian Law

This course introduces students to the principle doctrines and rules governing the legal and political relationships between American Indian tribes and the United States, as well as state governments.  

LGP 990 (03) - Law Special Topics

LawSpcTop/HumanRights & SocJus

Credits: 2.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Law (01/02/2023 - 05/12/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   50  
CRN: 56570
Special topics courses explore emerging developments in the law or take advantage of special expertise provided by visitors and guest faculty. Courses offered under this title are approved by the Associate Dean and may be designated to meet skills or advanced writing requirements. Special topics classes may only satisfy elective credit and are available only to law students after their first year of study and graduate students by permission.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.
Instructors: Sindiso MnisiWeeks
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/2/2023 1/13/2023 MTWRF Hours Arranged TBA
Additional Course Details: 

Human Rights-Based Social Justice 

Over the past two decades, nonprofit organizations and social justice activists around the world have adopted human rights frameworks, strategies and tools to advance their goals. At the international level, Oxfam and Action Aid, for example, have embraced human rights-based approaches to their social justice work. National and local non-profit organizations and activists from Vermont, Peru, South Africa and India have also discovered that human rights can provide a legitimate and coherent framework for analyzing public policy and organizing people to demand social justice. Drawing on case studies from the United States and globally, this course examines human rights-based approaches adopted by non-profit organizations to advocate on social justice issues affecting marginalized groups, including women, children, racial and ethnic groups, people with disabilities and migrant workers. In particular, this course draws on cases from domestic, regional and international courts around the world to elucidate how human rights-based approaches and arguments have been used to advance social justice, albeit often meeting with varied success. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to: (1) understand and apply basic principles of international human rights law; (2) understand how human rights can be effectively translated, through advocacy and practice, in varied empirical contexts; (3) articulate key social justice arguments for and against adoption of the human rights frameworks, strategies and tools demonstrated in the course case studies; and (4) critically engage with different sources of human rights law––including international agreements (treaties and conventions), customary (international and domestic) law, judicial decisions, domestic constitutions, statutes, and policies––from a social justice perspective. 

In-Person attendance required.