Timeroom: Fall 2024

Displaying 81 - 90 of 144 Results for: Subject = ENGL
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 533 (02) - Introduction to Film Studies

Intro to Film Studies

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2024 - Full Term (08/26/2024 - 12/09/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 10610
A survey of the international development of the motion picture from the silent period to the present, emphasizing film's narrative practices. Introduces students to the study of the art, history, technology, economics, and theory of cinema. Films and film makers of various nations, periods, movements, and genres examined.
Equivalent(s): ENGL 533H, ENGL 533W
Only listed colleges in section: Liberal Arts
Attributes: Humanities(Disc)
Instructors: Matthias Konzett
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2024 12/9/2024 TR 5:10pm - 6:30pm HS G34
Additional Course Details: 

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A survey of the international development of film from the early and silent periods to the present. The course examines films and filmmakers from various nations, periods, movements, and genres, including German Expressionism, Soviet Montage, French New Wave, American Independent Cinema, film noir, documentary, avant-garde, and music video. Special attention will be given to the Classical Hollywood system as well as methods of close formal analysis based on the critical and technical vocabulary of the field. Topics will explore the narrative and ideological practices of cinema and how they establish, revise, and subvert filmic conventions. Other topics include film history, economic/commercial aspects of the film industry, and basic film theory. We will also discuss film as both an artistic and popular medium. No additional screenings outside of class time.

This course satisfies the "Genres or Theory" requirement for English majors.

This course may count towards the "Two 500-Level Introductory Courses" requirement for English Literature majors. 

This course satisfies the "One English Department Course in Writing, Linguistics, Critical Theory, Film or Literature" requirement for English Teaching majors. 

This course satisfies the "One additional 500/600/700 level English course" requirement for English/Journalism majors. 

 

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 534 (01) - 21st Century Journalism: How the News Works

21st Century Journalism

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2024 - Full Term (08/26/2024 - 12/09/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   5  
CRN: 11392
This class explores ways new technology, including social media, has affected the practice of journalism, and examines journalism past and present. Students discuss libel law, ethics and how to define plagiarism in the digital age. This survey is meant not only to lay a foundation for prospective journalists, but also to provide a broad understanding of the news media for those interested in how the news works.
Section Comments: This section reserved for E/Journalism Majors only
Cross listed with : ENGL 534.02
Only listed colleges in section: Liberal Arts
Only listed majors in section: ENGLISH/JOURNAL
Attributes: Environment,Tech&Society(Disc)
Instructors: Lisa Miller
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2024 12/9/2024 TR 9:40am - 11:00am HS 104
Additional Course Details: 

This is a required course for all English/Journalism majors. 

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 534 (02) - 21st Century Journalism: How the News Works

21st Century Journalism

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2024 - Full Term (08/26/2024 - 12/09/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 12190
This class explores ways new technology, including social media, has affected the practice of journalism, and examines journalism past and present. Students discuss libel law, ethics and how to define plagiarism in the digital age. This survey is meant not only to lay a foundation for prospective journalists, but also to provide a broad understanding of the news media for those interested in how the news works.
Section Comments: This section open for General registration/all students
Cross listed with : ENGL 534.01
Only listed colleges in section: Liberal Arts
Attributes: Environment,Tech&Society(Disc)
Instructors: Lisa Miller
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2024 12/9/2024 TR 9:40am - 11:00am HS 104
Additional Course Details: 

This is a required course for all English/Journalism majors. This section (534.02) is open to all students regardless of major or class standing

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 550 (01) - Introduction to the Literature and Culture of Race

Intro to Lit and Cult of Race

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2024 - Full Term (08/26/2024 - 12/09/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 16147
This course introduces students to readings across the field of ethnic literature and culture in order to form their capacity to speak and think critically about race relations in America. Readings will include those in race theory, racial construction and authenticity, histories of raced subjects in America, the rise of ethnic studies, white ignorance and whiteness studies, the intersectionality of race with gender, sexual orientation, economic class, religion, and faith. Includes Asian American, African American, Native, and Latino/a literature.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course, Inquiry (Discovery), Humanities(Disc)
Instructors: Monica Chiu
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2024 12/9/2024 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm HS 240
Additional Course Details: 

Fall 2024 Detailed Description: 

What is race? How does it matter and why? This course introduces students to very contemporary literature and media by and about ethnic Americans, specifically Black, Asian American, Native American, and Latinx subjects. What issues do the characters in these works face? What do their challenges mean for us? Novels, poems, essays, graphic narrative, pop culture, film. Possible texts include Orange’s Vanishing Stars; Ward’s Let Us Descend; selections from Castillo’s How to Read Now: Essays; selected poems by Ocean Vuong and Tayi Tibble; one graphic narrative. Students also will use materials in the UNH archive to research and write about race and UNH, past and present.

This course satisfies the Race, Gender & Postcolonial Studies requirement for English Majors. 

This cousre satisfies the Race & Racial Theories requirement for English Literature, English: TBD, English/Journalism, English/Law 3+3, English Teaching Majors. 

 

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 585 (01) - Introduction to Women in Literature

Intro to Women in Literature

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2024 - Full Term (08/26/2024 - 12/09/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 16135
The goal of this course is to examine women's roles in literary traditions, including women as authors and women as characters. We interrogate categories of sex, gender, and sexuality as they intersect with other categories of identity including race, class, and nation. Specific topics differ each semester according to the individual instructor. Recent semesters have included "Jewish Women Writers" and "Female Authors of the Mystery Novel". May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic.
Section Comments: Special Topic: Women Writers on the Edge
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Equivalent(s): ENGL 585H, ENGL 585R
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Brigitte Bailey
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2024 12/9/2024 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm HS 108
Additional Course Details: 

Fall 2024 Special Topic: Women Writers on the Edge

Julia Ward Howe - Wikiwand   undefined   Alison Bechdel book signing Nov 7 at Central Library – Library News Online

The goal of English 585 is to examine women's roles in literary traditions, including women as authors and women as characters. We interrogate categories of sex, gender, and sexuality as they intersect with other categories of identity including race, class, and nation. In this version of English 585, we’ll read fiction and one graphic autobiography by 19th, 20th, and 21st-century women writers who imagine characters at the margins of their social worlds. 19th-century novels will include Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Julia Ward Howe’s The Hermaphrodite, and Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig. 20th-century novels will range from Nella Larsen’s Passing to Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale to Octavia Butler’s Kindred. The graphic narrative will be Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home. We’ll also read some short stories, poems, and short nonfiction by contemporaries of these authors. English 585 is writing intensive. In Fall 2024 this course may count towards a Women’s and Gender Studies major or minor.

This course satsifes a Post-1800 Literature requirement for English Literature, English: TBD, English/Journalism, English/Law 3+3 Majors.

This course satisfies the "One English Department course in Writing, Linguistics, Critical Theory, Film or Literature" requirenent for English Teaching majors. 

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 595 (01) - Literary Topics

Literary Topics

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2024 - Full Term (08/26/2024 - 12/09/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 16136
Investigate in depth a literary topic of particular interest, in a course specially designed for both majors and non-majors. Themes vary from semester to semester--recent topics include the contemporary short story, Irish literature, animals in literature, and the literature of the Vietnam War. See the English Department for details of current offerings. May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic.
Section Comments: Special Topic: Lit & Medicine
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Equivalent(s): ENGL 595H, ENGL 595W
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Sandhya Shetty
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2024 12/9/2024 TR 9:40am - 11:00am HS 201
Additional Course Details: 

Fall 2024 Special Topic: Literature & Medicine

Focusing on the intersections between literature and medicine, this course is for anyone curious about the cultural dimensions of medicine. With the help of literature, we will read and write about the enduring questions that arise around situations and experiences the body and mind undergo when sick, recovering, suffering, or dying. We will examine historical and visual texts that enhance our understanding of medicine and of literature, two discourses with affiliations that go back centuries.  Ranging over several centuries and cultures, the works selected help us define key historical moments as well as urgent contemporary issues with respect to the body, human and sometimes nonhuman. Collectively, the literary texts we will read illuminate the experience of illness (pain, suffering, sympathy etc.); explore the nature of medical practice and disease in various cultures and  the way the medical is intertwined with the politics underlying these realms of human experience;  provide a historical perspective on all of the foregoing. Texts will be drawn from different genres (fiction, essay, and drama), national cultures, and historical periods.  

This course satisfies the Genres or Theory requirment for English Majors. 

This course satisfies a Post-1800 Literature requirement for English Literature, English: TBD, English/Law 3+3, English/Journalism Majors.

This course satisfies the "One English Course in Writing, Linguistics, Critical Theory, Film or Literature" requirement for English Teaching Majors. 

 

Manchester   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 602 (M1) - Advanced Professional and Technical Writing

Adv Professional & Tech Writ

Online Course Delivery Method: Online Synchronous
Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2024 - Full Term (08/26/2024 - 12/09/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   5  
CRN: 13215
An advanced writing course focusing on writing in a global and technological workplace. In addition to fluency in the documents of the workplace, students focus on visual rhetoric in a technological environment through web design and usability while studying the issues of globalism, ethics, and the environment that affect all professional writing today. May be repeated with approval of instructor.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Cross listed with : ET 625.M1
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Samantha Donnelly
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2024 12/9/2024 W 6:10pm - 9:00pm ONLINE
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 605 (01) - Intermediate Linguistic Analysis

Intermediate Linguistic Analys

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2024 - Full Term (08/26/2024 - 12/09/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   10  
CRN: 10266
Introduces analysis methods and problem solving in phonology, morphology, and syntax using data from many languages. Emphasis will be both practical (learning how to describe the grammar and sound system of a language) and theoretical (understanding languages' behavior).
Section Comments: Also listed as LING 605.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 405 or LING 405
Equivalent(s): LING 605
Cross listed with : LING 605.01
Instructors: Rachel Burdin
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2024 12/9/2024 MW 2:10pm - 3:30pm HS 104
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 616C (01) - Studies in Film/Culture and Ideology

Studies in Film/Cult &Ideology

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2024 - Full Term (08/26/2024 - 12/09/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 16137
Advanced, focused study of the narrative, dramatic, and poetic practices of cinema, within one of four possible subject areas: A) Genre; B) Authorship; C) Culture and Ideology; D) Narrative and Style. Precise issues and methods may vary, ranging from general and specific considerations of how a given subject area involves film theory, criticism, and history, to its use in diverse analyses of selected national cinemas, periods, movements, and filmmakers. May be repeated for credit barring duplication of topic. Barring duplication of material taken for credit in CMN 650, course may be repeated for credit. Detailed course descriptions available in the English department office.
Section Comments: Special Topic FA24: Sci-Fi Film
Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.
Equivalent(s): AMST 605, ENGL 616
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Matthias Konzett
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2024 12/9/2024 TR 3:40pm - 5:00pm HS 140
Additional Course Details: 

Pin on All About Movies and TV Shows

This course examines the emergence of sci-fi films from cheaper and sensational B genre productions into ambitious and costly A genre films raising serious social and cultural questions. As imagined utopian or dystopian spaces, sci-fi films address contemporary issues of technology, standardization, authoritarian rule, invasion of privacy and surveillance. From within worlds of seemingly sanitized order, sci-fi films focus on troubling questions of health and immunology, genetics, eugenics, race, class, and gender. On a conceptual level, sci-fi films challenge perceptual notions of space and time and erase the difference between simulation and reality in their imagined cyber worlds. We will explore the relation of future oriented cinematic worlds to the cultural present in which they are screened. Classic sci-fi films (e.g. 2001: A Space Odyssey) will be examined along with more recent films (e.g. Children of Men, District 9; Minority Report). Particular attention will be paid to the variety of genres invoked by sci-fi films ranging from horror (Alien), to mystery (Ex-Machina) epic superhero (The Matrix) noir (Blade Runner), and the recent Dune series by Dennis Villeneuve.

This course satisfies the 'Genres or Theory' requirement for English majors.

This course satisfies the GENRE requirement for English Literature majors. 

This course counts towards the DH Component requirement for English: TBD majors. 

This course may satisfy the 'One English Course in Writing Linguistics, Critical Theory, Film or Literature' requirement for English Teaching majors. 

This course satisfies the 'One additional 500/600/700 level (non-Journalism course) requirement for English/Journalism majors. 

This course satisfies an upper-level ENGL course requirement for English/Law 3+3 majors. 

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 618 (01) - Film Theory

Film Theory

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2024 - Full Term (08/26/2024 - 12/09/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 10866
Examines basic theories of film and their relationship to the practice of close analysis of film. Theories are meant to provide students with a vocabulary for critical analysis and stress the many ways of seeing film.
Instructors: Matthias Konzett
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2024 12/9/2024 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm HS G35
Additional Course Details: 

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We will examine basic theories of film and their relationship to the practice of “close analysis.” How do film theorists discuss the experience of film, spectatorship, apparatus, and production in a variety of theoretical contexts and explore major film theories such as those of formalism, realism, auteurism, star/celebrity culture, gender, psychoanalysis, genre, race, cultural and media studies? Theories are meant to provide students with a vocabulary for close analysis of film and will stress the many ways of seeing and experiencing film. Our primary responsibility will be finding ways to speak and write about film and its significance as a complex aesthetic and social sign. Films discussed in class iinclude works by Quentin Tarantino, Wes Anderson, Coen Brothers, Christopher Nolan, Ryan Coogler, Kathryn Bigelow, Lana and Lily Wachowski, Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert, Benny and Josh Safdie, Peter Jackson, and Alejandro Iñárritu.

This course satisfies the 'Genres or Theory' requirement for English majors.

This course satisfies the GENRE requirement for English Literature majors. 

This course counts towards the DH Component requirement for English: TBD majors. 

This course may satisfy the 'One English Course in Writing Linguistics, Critical Theory, Film or Literature' requirement for English Teaching majors. 

This course satisfies the 'One additional 500/600/700 level' (non-Journalism course) requirement for English/Journalism majors. 

This course satisfies an upper-level ENGL course requirement for English/Law 3+3 majors.