Timeroom: Summer 2024

Displaying 271 - 280 of 690 Results for: All Courses
Durham   Liberal Arts :: History

HIST 421 (01) - World History to the 16th Century

World History to 16th Century

Online Course Delivery Method: Online Asynchronous
Credits: 4.0
Term: Summer 2024 - Summer Session I (05/20/2024 - 06/21/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   35  
CRN: 70847
The global experience of human communities with special emphasis on the development of the major civilizations and their interactions. Comparisons of social, cultural, religious, and political life and the emergence of distinctive and diverse human societies are examined. Course meets the History major requirement for Group III.
Registration Approval Required. Contact Instructor or Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Mutual Exclusion : HIS 402
Attributes: Online (no campus visits), Historical Perspectives(Disc), EUNH
Instructors: David Bachrach
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
5/20/2024 6/21/2024 Hours Arranged ONLINE
Additional Course Details: 

The Premodern World at War

Fulfills the Group 3 Requirement for History Majors

There are three overarching goals for this course. First, students will gain an understanding of the central role played by warfare in world history in the period up through 1600. Among the topics treated in this context are the nature of military obligation, the relationship between military service and political rights, the role of warfare in defining gender roles, the development of military technology, and the relationship between large-scale warfare and the development of governing institutions. Secondly, students will gain an understanding of the discipline of history. Important topics that students will examine in this context are the range of historical sources available for pre-modern history, and particularly for the investigation of military matters, the problems of historical epistemology, with a particular focus on source criticism, and the techniques used by historians to gain information about the past from the broad array of available source materials. Finally, this course will provide students with an opportunity to improve their critical reading skills, their writing skills, and their oral communication skills. Of these three sets of goals, improving reading, writing and speaking are the most important. 

Durham   Liberal Arts :: History

HIST 425 (01) - Foreign Cultures

Foreign Cultures

Online Course Delivery Method: Online Asynchronous
Can be taken by students who are remote.
Credits: 4.0
Term: Summer 2024 - Summer Session IV (06/24/2024 - 07/26/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   35  
CRN: 70848
Introduces the culture of a particular nation or region; preparation for experiencing a foreign culture. Consult department for listing of topics. Course meets the History major requirement for Group II or III, depending on the topic.
Equivalent(s): HIST 425H, HIST 425W
Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery), Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Instructors: Fredrik Meiton
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
6/24/2024 7/26/2024 Hours Arranged ONLINE
Additional Course Details: 

This asynchronous course explores the historical relationship between human societies and energy. Today, the United States make up some 5 percent of the world’s population but account for a quarter of the world’s energy consumption. Why? Is there something in American society that predisposes it to high energy consumption, or did the high consumption make American society? And what does the relationship between politics, culture, and energy look like in other parts of the world?

Over the course of the semester, we will examine the history of energy production, distribution, and consumption around the world, and how it has impacted the world we live in. We will grapple with questions of whether certain technologies make certain societies inevitable, or whether perhaps it is the other way around. Each week, we will explore one or two sources of energy, and look at their impact on the societies and people involved in its generation, distribution, and consumption. We will see how energy can shed light on topics as varied as geopolitical power relations, war, labor organizing, gender roles, leisure activities, and the climate.

Manchester   Liberal Arts :: History

HIST 497 (M1) - Explorations in Historical Perspectives

Expl Historical Perspectives

Online Course Delivery Method: Online Asynchronous
Credits: 4.0
Term: Summer 2024 - Summer Session IV (06/24/2024 - 07/26/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 70832
In-depth exploration of a particular historical question or topic: for example, the French Revolution, Chaucer's England, or the New Deal. Students should consult with the Department of History for a list of topics and instructors. Course meets the History major requirements for Group I, II, or III, depending on the topic.
Section Comments: Topic is "Epidemics in American History"
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Equivalent(s): HIST 497H, HIST 497W
Attributes: Online (no campus visits), Historical Perspectives(Disc), EUNH
Instructors: Sonic Woytonik
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
6/24/2024 7/26/2024 Hours Arranged ONLINE
Additional Course Details: 

Epidemics in American History

In this course, students will explore the American past through the careful examination of 8 outbreaks and epidemics between the colonial era and the present: smallpox, yellow fever, polio, typhoid fever, influenza, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, and COVID-19. Students will use case studies to uncover the impact of these diseases on American medicine, politics, economy, demographics, and the daily lives of affected individuals. Students will gain research skills through extensive use of primary sources including newspapers, diaries, archaeological findings, and oral traditions of illness as well as modern sources like photographs, blogs, news, and digital media, and representations of disease on television and film. We will seek to explore the ways that past Americans reacted differently to outbreaks of disease, as well as the ways that our modern experience mirrors the past.  

 

 

Durham   Liberal Arts :: History

HIST 498 (01) - Explorations of Historical Perspectives

Expl Hist Perspectives

Online Course Delivery Method: Online Asynchronous
Credits: 4.0
Term: Summer 2024 - Summer Session IV (06/24/2024 - 07/26/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   35  
CRN: 70965
In-depth exploration of a particular historical question or topic: for example, the French Revolution, Chaucer's England, or the New Deal. Students should consult with the Department of History for a list of topics and instructors. Course meets the History major requirements for Group I, II, or III, depending on the topic.
Section Comments: The Roaring `20s: Becoming Modern in the U.S.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Attributes: Online (no campus visits), Historical Perspectives(Disc), EUNH
Instructors: Lucy Salyer
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
6/24/2024 7/26/2024 Hours Arranged ONLINE
Additional Course Details: 

"THE ROARING '20's:  BECOMING MODERN IN THE U.S."

Fulfills Historical Perspectives Discovery requirement; History Major/Minor Elective

“The world broke in two in 1922 or thereabouts.”  So said the novelist Willa Cather, capturing the view of many Americans that the 1920s ushered in a distinctly modern age.  Everything seemed new and exciting: automobiles, radios, ‘moving pictures’, Harlem jazz clubs, flappers, speakeasies, skyscrapers.  But not all Americans embraced modernity.  The resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan, racial violence, the Scopes “Monkey” Trial, the Red Scare, massive immigration restrictions, a widening generation gap, debates over the “new woman” – all revealed deep cultural divides in what some have called an “age of anxiety.  Relying heavily on a variety of cultural sources of the era – films, famous trials, literature, art, advertisements, cartoons,  commentaries – we will explore the tensions and contradictions of the 1920s as Americans struggled over what becoming “modern” meant for their personal lives, and for the nation as a whole. 

Durham   Liberal Arts :: History

HIST 897 (01) - Colloquium

Colloquium

Credits: 4.0
Term: Summer 2024 - Summer Session I (05/20/2024 - 06/21/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   2  
CRN: 71021
Selected topics in American, European, and non-Western history. Required of history majors. Students must elect section in the department office at the time of registration.
Registration Approval Required. Contact Instructor or Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Kimberly Alexander
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
5/20/2024 6/21/2024 Hours Arranged TBA
Manchester   Coll of Professional Studies :: Homeland Security

HLS 455 (M1) - Introduction to Cybersecurity

Introduction to Cybersecurity

Online Course Delivery Method: Online Asynchronous
Credits: 4.0
Term: Summer 2024 - Summer Session II (05/20/2024 - 07/26/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 70806
The primary focus of HLS 455 is to provide a survey of the broad field of cybersecurity and information security/assurance. Topics will include a definition of information security, the need for information security and cybersecurity in both the public and private sectors, ethical and legal issues revolving around cybersecurity, risk management and planning, and information/cyber security technology. The role of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in securing the cyberspace and the nation's information-related infrastructures will also be explored.
Registration Approval Required. Contact Instructor or Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Attributes: Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Instructors: David Ramsay
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
5/20/2024 7/26/2024 Hours Arranged ONLINE
Manchester   Coll of Professional Studies :: Homeland Security

HLS 505 (M1) - Political Violence and Terrorism

Political Violence and Terror

Online Course Delivery Method: Online Asynchronous
Credits: 4.0
Term: Summer 2024 - Summer Session IV (06/24/2024 - 07/26/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 70223
This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of political violence and terrorism. The class includes inquiry into the theories and justifications for political violence of all types, limited war, asymmetric warfare and the contested term terrorism. Trends and reasons for contemporary violent political extremism as a phenomenon are particularly explored from both the U.S. domestic and international perspectives. Students are introduced to the ideologies, goals, and strategies of select organizations and broader extremist movements.
Equivalent(s): PS 505
Attributes: Social Science (Discovery), Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Instructors: Omero Navarro Ambriz
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
6/24/2024 7/26/2024 Hours Arranged ONLINE
Manchester   Coll of Professional Studies :: Homeland Security

HLS 520 (M1) - Homeland Security Law and Policy

Law and Policy

Online Course Delivery Method: Online Asynchronous
Credits: 4.0
Term: Summer 2024 - Summer Session II (05/20/2024 - 07/26/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   15  
CRN: 70423
This course is an overview of key legal, policy, and ethical issues in the context of Homeland Security policy and practice. Students examine legal concepts regarding constitutional rights of individuals, legal process, access to courts, the law of war, and national security principles as they relate to homeland security legislation and policy initiatives. Legal principles of due process, habeas corpus, search and seizure. Compulsory process, and international agreements are explored in greater depth. The law of war will be examined in the context of preemptive war and the current National Security Strategy, the status of combatants and detention, Elements of national security law, intelligence collection and sharing, the Patriot Act, and military-civilian relations, etc.
Registration Approval Required. Contact Instructor or Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Prerequisite(s): HLS 410
Attributes: Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Instructors: Sonic Woytonik
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
5/20/2024 7/26/2024 Hours Arranged ONLINE
Manchester   Coll of Professional Studies :: Homeland Security

HLS 650 (M1) - Topics in National Security Intelligence

National Security Intelligence

Online Course Delivery Method: Online Asynchronous
Credits: 4.0
Term: Summer 2024 - Summer Session II (05/20/2024 - 07/26/2024)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 70425
What is national security intelligence? In this course students are introduced to definitions of intelligence and how they vary according to the entity employing the definition. Students learn about national security intelligence concepts including collection, analysis, counterintelligence, and covert action. Student will explore the organization and mission of the United States Intelligence Community, state and local intelligence agencies, and their role in Homeland Security.
Registration Approval Required. Contact Instructor or Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Prerequisite(s): HLS 410
Attributes: Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Instructors: Bridget Nolan
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
5/20/2024 7/26/2024 Hours Arranged ONLINE
Manchester   Coll of Professional Studies :: Homeland Security

HLS 770 (M1) - Internship in Homeland Security

HLS Internship

Credits: 4.0
Term: Summer 2024 - Full Term (05/20/2024 - 08/09/2024)
Grade Mode: Credit/Fail Grading
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 70199
This course represents the professional work experience required in the homeland security major. Students work in a professional setting for a minimum of 180 hours under the supervision of a site supervisor. All internships require students to identify and complete work on a specific project (s) approved by the HLS coordinator. Internships may be taken at any time after students have taken 30 credits of university coursework. Note that students who are academically or otherwise unable to enter into internship must take HLS 799 (thesis in homeland security which requires senior standing and permission from the HLS program coordinator).
Section Comments: Must have a worksite and site supervisor to register in Handshake. Minimum of 180 hours onsite is required. See "Professional Experience" requirements posted in HLS@UNH.
Instructor Approval Required. Contact Instructor for permission then register through Webcat.
Prerequisite(s): HLS 410 and HLS 455 and HLS 480
Instructors: Terrence OSullivan
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
5/20/2024 8/9/2024 Hours Arranged TBA
Additional Course Details: 

Registering for academic credit does not complete your required internship approval process. Students must register and “submit an experience” in the UNH online platform of Handshake once they have their internship. Visit https://unh.joinhandshake.com/experiences/new to complete your approval process.

For more information on how to complete the Handshake approval process visit, https://manchester.unh.edu/student-internships or contact the UNH CPS Career and Professional Success (CaPS) Office with questions.