Timeroom: Spring 2023

Displaying 381 - 390 of 1184 Results for: Level = All Graduate
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 879 (01) - Linguistic Field Methods

Linguistic Field Methods

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Full Term (01/24/2023 - 05/08/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   5  
CRN: 51142
Special Fees: $12.00
Devoted to the study, with use of an informant, of some non-Indo-European language that is unfamiliar to both the students and the instructor at the beginning of the class. The primary aim of the course is to give students a practical introduction to linguistic analysis without the support of a text. Theoretical concepts are introduced as needed.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Sean Madigan
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/24/2023 5/8/2023 MWF 1:10pm - 2:00pm HS 240
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 889 (01) - Special Topics in English Teaching

SpcTop/YA Literature

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Full Term (01/24/2023 - 05/08/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   10  
CRN: 54979
Advanced theories and practices course on English Teaching. Topics such as A) Teaching Young Adult Literature, C) Teaching English in Diverse Contexts, D) Teaching Drama, N) Teaching Nonfiction, R) English Teachers as Researchers, and T) Alternate Literacies and Teaching Technologies. Barring duplication of subject, course may be repeated for credit. For details see course descriptions available in the English department.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Instructors: Laura Smith
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/24/2023 5/8/2023 TR 3:40pm - 5:00pm HS 202
Additional Course Details: 

 

Spring 2023 Special Topic: Teaching Young Adult Literature

Adolescence, for many students, seems to be a period during which love of reading dies. In fact, studies reveal that “less than one-third of 13-year-olds read daily” and “only 16 percent of high school students” identify as “high frequent readers” (Gilmore 47; Newkirk 117).  But there is hope in the field of popular young adult (YA) literature!  In YA lit, adolescents can find books that match their interests and reading levels.  In this course, we’ll explore how YA literature can be used to foster lifelong readers.  We will read widely among genres of young adult literature (including both contemporary YA works as well as canonical literary works written for an adult audience but deemed appropriate for secondary students), focusing on the particular skills of literary criticism and theory required to establish a developmentally appropriate literature curriculum at the secondary level and to link young adult literature to canonical literary traditions.  Students should prepare themselves for quick-paced reading, discussion, research, and assignments in varied formats, from written responses to booktalks. 

 

 

Manchester   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 892 (M1) - Teaching Literature and Literacy

Teaching Literature & Literacy

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2023 - UNHM Credit (15 weeks) (01/24/2023 - 05/08/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   5  
CRN: 54332
This course introduces theories and practices of teaching literature and literacy, including teaching reading and writing as well as teaching literary analysis at the secondary level. Students also learn to plan lessons, choose texts, and create learning activities for speaking, listening, and viewing in grade five through twelve. The course is designed for students who are interested in teaching as a possible career.
Section Comments: Cross listed with ENGL 792
Instructors: C.C. Hendricks
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/24/2023 5/8/2023 T 3:31pm - 5:50pm PANDRA P501
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 892 (S01) - Teaching Literature and Literacy

Teaching Literature & Literacy

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Full Term (01/24/2023 - 05/08/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   5  
CRN: 50489
This course introduces theories and practices of teaching literature and literacy, including teaching reading and writing as well as teaching literary analysis at the secondary level. Students also learn to plan lessons, choose texts, and create learning activities for speaking, listening, and viewing in grade five through twelve. The course is designed for students who are interested in teaching as a possible career.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Alecia Magnifico
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/24/2023 5/8/2023 MW 3:40pm - 5:00pm HS 108
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 894 (01) - Syntax

Syntax

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Full Term (01/24/2023 - 05/08/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   5  
CRN: 50796
The relationship of grammar and meaning as viewed from the standpoint of modern linguistic theory. Emphasis on the syntax and semantics of English, with special attention to the construction of arguments for or against particular analyses. (Also offered as ENGL/LING 794). Prereq: a basic linguistic course or permission of the instructor.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Rochelle Lieber
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/24/2023 5/8/2023 TR 9:40am - 11:00am HS 108
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 897 (D01) - Special Studies in Literature

Special Studies in Literature

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Full Term (01/24/2023 - 05/08/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   4  
CRN: 56539
A) Old English Literature; B) Medieval Literature; C) 16th Century; D) 17th Century; E) 18th Century; F) English Romantic Period; G) Victorian Period; H) 20th Century; I) Drama; J) Novel; K) Poetry; L) Nonfiction; M) American Literature; N) A Literary Problem; O) Literature of the Renaissance. The precise topics and methods of each section vary. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. For details, see the course descriptions available in the English department.
Section Comments: Special Topic: Women's Literary Traditions
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Rachel Trubowitz
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/24/2023 5/8/2023 MW 2:10pm - 3:30pm HS 344
Additional Course Details: 

SP23 Course Details: Special Studies in Literature "Early English Women Writers"

This course takes a close look at women writers in England, from the medieval period through the eighteenth century.  We will view their work within a historical, social, biographical, theoretical, and critical context.

The course builds on earlier waves of women’s studies and women’s literary studies. The first phase in 1960s and 1970s sought a voice for women scholars as well as for women writers, which led to the establishment of theoretical women’s studies programs in the 1980s.  In the 1980s scholars focused primarily on the “recovery” of unknown women authors (most notably through the Brown Women’s Writers Project, founded at Brown University in 1986, and dedicated to making available hand-typed transcriptions of women’s works published in their own time but not available in any modern edition).  The 1990s and early 2000’s witnessed the merging of women’s studies with gender studies (in an effort to include men as well as women and multiple sexual orientations). In the last fifteen years, scholars have reviewed women’s writing through a more critical (vs. biographical) lens. New digital technologies led to new ways of recovering “lost” early women writers and the social networks in which their works circulated. As a result of all these movements, early modern women writers are no longer non-existent, as was the case in the academy through the late 1980s.

Incorporating both old and new discoveries and formats, this course will open your eyes to a blazing new world of early women writers from Marie de France to Mary Wroth, to Mary Wollstonecraft.  Readings will include, Marie de France, “Lanval” (@1155); Christine de Pizan, The Book of the City of Ladies (1405); Elizabeth I (1500s); Amelia Lanyer, “The Description of Cooke-ham “(1611); Mary Wroth, Pamphilia to Amphilanthus (1621); Margaret Cavendish, The Blazing World (1666); Fanny Burney, Evelina, or the History of a Young Lady's Entrance into the World (1778); and Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792).

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 897 (E01) - Special Studies in Literature

Special Studies in Literature

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Full Term (01/24/2023 - 05/08/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   5  
CRN: 56390
A) Old English Literature; B) Medieval Literature; C) 16th Century; D) 17th Century; E) 18th Century; F) English Romantic Period; G) Victorian Period; H) 20th Century; I) Drama; J) Novel; K) Poetry; L) Nonfiction; M) American Literature; N) A Literary Problem; O) Literature of the Renaissance. The precise topics and methods of each section vary. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. For details, see the course descriptions available in the English department.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Sean Moore
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/24/2023 5/8/2023 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm HS 232
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 897 (M01) - Special Studies in Literature

Special Studies in Literature

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Full Term (01/24/2023 - 05/08/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   5  
CRN: 56646
A) Old English Literature; B) Medieval Literature; C) 16th Century; D) 17th Century; E) 18th Century; F) English Romantic Period; G) Victorian Period; H) 20th Century; I) Drama; J) Novel; K) Poetry; L) Nonfiction; M) American Literature; N) A Literary Problem; O) Literature of the Renaissance. The precise topics and methods of each section vary. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. For details, see the course descriptions available in the English department.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Brigitte Bailey
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/24/2023 5/8/2023 MW 10:10am - 11:30am HS G35
Additional Course Details: 

SP23 Special Topic: Urban Writing and American Cities

Big cities were new in the 19th-century U.S.—and triggered new forms of consciousness and representation. This course traces the growth of urban literature from the period before the Civil War into the 20th century. We’ll “visit” Boston, New York (a lot), and Chicago—and we’ll consider the city as a space of capital, consumption, and labor. We’ll read mostly novels, which became THE method for plumbing the depths of modern, urban experience and consciousness—by such writers as the Jewish-American immigrant Abraham Cahan and the Harlem Renaissance observer Nella Larsen. But we’ll also look at Edgar Allan Poe’s tales, Fanny Fern’s urban journalism, and Jacob Riis’s documentary photos; and we’ll end with a silent film: The Crowd. Other writers may include Horatio Alger, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Rebecca Harding Davis, Theodore Dreiser, and James Weldon Johnson. We’ll consider theories of urban space, consciousness, and expression that will open up all that we read and view. Assignments will include: summaries of theoretical and critical readings, short response papers on specific texts, an annotated bibliography, oral reports, a 5-page paper, and a 12-15 page research paper.

   

 

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 897 (N01) - Special Studies in Literature

Special Studies in Literature

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Full Term (01/24/2023 - 05/08/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   10  
CRN: 56391
A) Old English Literature; B) Medieval Literature; C) 16th Century; D) 17th Century; E) 18th Century; F) English Romantic Period; G) Victorian Period; H) 20th Century; I) Drama; J) Novel; K) Poetry; L) Nonfiction; M) American Literature; N) A Literary Problem; O) Literature of the Renaissance. The precise topics and methods of each section vary. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. For details, see the course descriptions available in the English department.
Section Comments: Special Topic: Trauma and The Environment
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Petar Ramadanovic
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/24/2023 5/8/2023 M 1:10pm - 4:00pm HS 250C
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 897 (N02) - Special Studies in Literature

Special Studies in Literature

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2023 - Full Term (01/24/2023 - 05/08/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   5  
CRN: 56578
A) Old English Literature; B) Medieval Literature; C) 16th Century; D) 17th Century; E) 18th Century; F) English Romantic Period; G) Victorian Period; H) 20th Century; I) Drama; J) Novel; K) Poetry; L) Nonfiction; M) American Literature; N) A Literary Problem; O) Literature of the Renaissance. The precise topics and methods of each section vary. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. For details, see the course descriptions available in the English department.
Section Comments: Special Studies in Literature: Asian Americans in Prose & Pictures
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Monica Chiu
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/24/2023 5/8/2023 MW 11:10am - 12:30pm HS 108
Additional Course Details: 

Spring 2023 Special Topic: Asian American Studies in Prose and Pictures

“I’m not a virus” resonated among Asian North Americans during the height of anti-Asian violence, instigated by the Covid-19 pandemic. With allies, they railed against a resurgence of the repellant notion of a Yellow Peril. They called for better understanding and new representations of Asian North Americans. What do you want to learn about the histories, cultures, and stories of Asian North Americans? This course will use both very contemporary written works (novels, short stories, poetry) and the medium of graphic narrative to widen our understanding of who Asian North Americans are as expressed in their own words and self-images. Possible course texts include the following pairings: Cao’s novel Monkey Bridge with GB Tran’s graphic narrative Vietnamerica; Ng’s novel Everything I Never Told You with Chong and Webber’s graphic pathography Dancing After TEN; Otsuka’s novel When the Emperor Was Divine with Tamaki’s collection of graphic narrative vignettes Boundless, among other titles.