Timeroom: Spring 2022

Displaying 361 - 370 of 1212 Results for: Level = All Graduate
Durham   Liberal Arts :: Education

EDUC 998 (1SY) - Special Topics

Spc Top/TIPPs II seminar

Online Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 1.0
Term: Spring 2022 - Full Term (01/25/2022 - 05/09/2022)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 55162
Study of a particular theoretical, methodological, or policy issue. May be offered off campus as professional development.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.
Instructors: Mary Schuh
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/25/2022 5/9/2022 T 4:40pm - 7:00pm ONLINE
Durham   Liberal Arts :: Education

EDUC 999 (01) - Doctoral Research

Doctoral Research

Credits: 0.0
Term: Spring 2022 - Full Term* (01/25/2022 - 05/09/2022)
Grade Mode: Graduate Credit/Fail grading
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 52139
Cr/F.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Suzanne Graham
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/25/2022 5/9/2022 Hours Arranged MORR B02
Additional Course Details: 

Please email: Education.Department@unh.edu, for course permission

Manchester   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 800 (M1) - Studies in Literature

Stdy/Shakespeare,Comics,Plays

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2022 - UNHM Credit (15 weeks) (01/25/2022 - 05/09/2022)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   2  
CRN: 55809
Students in the MAT, MEd, and MST programs, as well as non-degree students, can register for graduate course work in English under this number. The precise topics and focus of each section vary. Topics include Old English Literature, Medieval Literature, 16th century, 17th century, 18th century, English Romantic Period, Victorian Period, 20th and 21st Century, Drama, Novel, Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, A Literary Problem, Literature of the Renaissance, Postcolonial Literature, 20th to 21st Century American Literature. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. Note: Students in the MA and PhD programs in English may not take English 800 for credit toward their degrees. English 800 will only be offered on the Manchester campus.
Section Comments: Cross listed with ENGL 797
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Susanne Paterson
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/25/2022 5/9/2022 M 6:01pm - 9:00pm PANDRA P345
Additional Course Details: 

This class acknowledges the critical importance of Shakespeare's works as cultural documents. By examining a selection of his dramatic works in the context of literary, cinematic, and graphic novel adaptations, we'll see that these plays have had a profound influence on other writers and artists over the centuries.

Comics, films, and literature have all been inspired by Shakespeare's dramatic works. In this class we will explore these inspirations, as well as the originals from which they are created. We'll analyze four Shakespeare plays--The Taming of the Shrew; Othello; Macbeth; and The Tempest--as a work in and of itself, looking at the ways in which Shakespeare has handled characterization, dramatic plotting, language, and a series of other literary techniques. We'll then move on to an analysis of films, comic books, and literary adaptations of these Shakespearean dramas. They'll be either clear "rewritings" of the plays, showing strong adherence to the original, or they'll be quite free versions of the plays, showing some echoes or inspirations from Shakespeare, but demonstrating their authors' own visions of characterization, plot, and theme. By the end of the semester, we should have a heightened appreciation not only for the original Shakespeare plays, but also for the ways in which filmmakers, comic book artists and other playwrights have harnessed Shakespeare's vision and made it their own.

Course fulfills pre-1800 requirement for English, English Teaching, and LS majors. It is Writing Intensive.

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 804 (01) - Advanced Nonfiction Writing

Advanced Nonfiction Writing

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2022 - Full Term (01/25/2022 - 05/09/2022)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   10  
CRN: 52271
This workshop embraces all forms of narrative nonfiction, including essays, memoir, literary journalism, and travel writing. Students write multiple pieces that serve as the heart of class discussion. In addition, the class discusses elements of craft and a myriad of selected readings that reflect the genre's range. May be repeated for credit with approval of the MFA director.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 24 credits.
Instructors: Sue Hertz
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/25/2022 5/9/2022 W 1:10pm - 4:00pm HS 250C
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 805 (01) - Advanced Poetry Workshop

Advanced Poetry Workshop

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2022 - Full Term (01/25/2022 - 05/09/2022)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   10  
CRN: 51468
Workshop discussion of advanced writing problems and submitted poems. Individual conferences with instructor. Prereq: writing poetry or equivalent. Written permission of instructor required for registration. May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department chairperson.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: David Blair
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/25/2022 5/9/2022 R 2:10pm - 5:00pm HS 250C
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 807 (01) - Fiction: Form and Technique

Topic/Fiction:Form & Technique

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2022 - Full Term (01/25/2022 - 05/09/2022)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   15  
CRN: 51577
A writer's view of the forms, techniques, and theories of fiction. The novels, short stories, and works of criticism studied vary, depending on the instructor.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Clark Knowles
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/25/2022 5/9/2022 T 9:40am - 12:30pm HS 250C
Additional Course Details: 

Literary Genrelessness: Writers dealing with the absurd, unexplainable, existential, and the unknown. Inspired by Giovanni Boccaccio’s plague stories gathered in “The Decameron,” the New York Times asked twenty-nine fiction writers to write about pandemic life for their Decameron Project. When reality is surreal, they surmised, only fiction can make sense of it. Making sense of reality is what storytellers have been doing since long before the written word, and in this class, we’ll read and discuss a wide variety of contemporary writers who do just that: N.K. Jemisin, Mohsin Hamid, Carmen Maria Machado, Shruti Swamy, Jennifer Egan, John Edgar Wideman, Clarice Lispector, Italo Calvino, Lydia Davis, and more. As writers, we’ll discuss issues of craft, intention, ambition, and perhaps most importantly, practical application of the skills gleaned from careful reading of authors who ignore genre in their quest to wrest sense from the senseless. We’ll leave no stone unturned as we ask not what it all means, but how it all works. How do these writers visualize, create, populate, and realize their stories? How do their choices both utilize and surmount realism? How do they access what John Gardner called the “vivid and continuous dream” of fiction? Since this class is about writers and for writers, we’ll read like writers, devotees to the lucid application of language in service of good art. We’ll also join these writers on the page, writing and presenting work that follows Jill Alexander Essbaum’s adage: “Obey no rule that impedes good art.” 

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 808 (01) - Nonfiction: Form and Technique

Nonfiction: Form and Technique

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2022 - Full Term (01/25/2022 - 05/09/2022)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   15  
CRN: 51843
A writer's view of contemporary nonfiction, emphasizing the choices the writer faces in the process of research and writing.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Sue Hertz
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/25/2022 5/9/2022 M 9:10am - 12:00pm HS 250C
Additional Course Details: 

English 808/Form & Technique of Nonfiction: On Structure.

As master nonfiction writer John McPhee says, “A piece of writing has to start somewhere, go somewhere, and sit down when it gets there.” What McPhee knows and we will explore is the myriad of structures that move true stories from beginning to end.  In this seminar, we will focus on narrative architecture and how to determine the arrangement that best suits the nonfiction tale, from straight chronology to reverse chronology to braided to lyric to circular to collage and beyond. We will read a range of long form and short form works by authors including McPhee, Maggie Nelson, Jerald Walker, Jaquira Diaz, Leslie Jamison, and Ander Monson, paying close attention to how they build tension and add layers. We will also play with structure in our own writing each week, culminating in a portfolio comprising a variety of narrative construction. Too often, we approach story assembly the same way. This course will shove us out of our comfort zone.  

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 809 (01) - Poetry: Form and Technique

Poetry: Form and Technique

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2022 - Full Term (01/25/2022 - 05/09/2022)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   15  
CRN: 54143
A writer's view of the problems, traditions, and structures of poetry.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: David Rivard
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/25/2022 5/9/2022 T 2:10pm - 5:00pm HS 250C
Additional Course Details: 

English 809--Translated Worlds

Although this version of the Poetry Form & Technique class will survey translations from the planet’s many poetic traditions, we will do so with an eye toward what makes for a good poem in English.  The translator’s task, wrote Walter Benjamin, should be with “that element in a translation which goes beyond transmittal of subject matter . . . the element that does not lend itself to translation.” In that spirit, I’m most interested in “versions” such as Christopher Logue’s Homer in War Music or Stephen Berg’s Rimbaud in Still Unilluminated I, as well as in how certain poets like Catullus, Sappho, Tu Fu, and Apollinaire continue to be updated by successive generations.  We’ll also examine the enduring influence of translated works on American poetry in the last 100+ years.  Besides the poets mentioned above, we will look at work by Wyslawa Szymborska, Tomas Transtromer, Patrizia Cavalli, Adelia Prado, Anna Ahkmatova, Rilke, Basho, Issa, Buson, Ikkyu, Miyazawa Kenji, Yannis Ritsos, and Cesar Vallejo, among others.  Student responsibilities will include a class presentation and directed discussion of one of our prime translation targets.  We’ll do weekly imitations of the poets we discuss.  (Students also have the option of doing an actual translation from the original, rather than an imitation.)  N.B. This is a class that requires a great deal of weekly reading, both poetry and essays, in addition to the writing we’ll do. Over a dozen books are on the required reading list.

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 816 (01) - Curriculum, Materials and Assessment in English as a Second Language

ESL Curriculum and Assessment

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2022 - Full Term (01/25/2022 - 05/09/2022)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   10  
CRN: 56714
A hands-on approach to developing curriculum and course material for teaching English as a Second Language. Students work on lesson plan development (needs analysis, objective writing, task sequencing, assessment of proficiency and objectives). Conduct ESL classroom observations, and engage in teaching demonstrations.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Soo Hyon Kim
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/25/2022 5/9/2022 TR 5:10pm - 6:30pm HS 201
Manchester   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 816 (M1) - Curriculum, Materials and Assessment in English as a Second Language

ESL Curriculum and Assessment

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2022 - UNHM Credit (15 weeks) (01/25/2022 - 05/09/2022)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   10  
CRN: 55690
A hands-on approach to developing curriculum and course material for teaching English as a Second Language. Students work on lesson plan development (needs analysis, objective writing, task sequencing, assessment of proficiency and objectives). Conduct ESL classroom observations, and engage in teaching demonstrations.
Section Comments: Cross listed with ENGL 716
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Anne McQuade
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/25/2022 5/9/2022 T 4:01pm - 6:30pm PANDRA P341