Timeroom: Fall 2021

Displaying 1611 - 1620 of 4379 Results for: All Courses
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 616D (01) - Studies in Film/Narrative and Style

Stdy in Film/Narrative & Style

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2021 - Full Term (08/30/2021 - 12/13/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 14926
Advanced, focused study of the narrative, dramatic, and poetic practices of cinema, within one of four possible subject areas: A) Genre; B) Authorship; C) Culture and Ideology; D) Narrative and Style. Precise issues and methods may vary, ranging from general and specific considerations of how a given subject area involves film theory, criticism, and history, to its use in diverse analyses of selected national cinemas, periods, movements, and filmmakers. May be repeated for credit barring duplication of topic. Barring duplication of material taken for credit in CMN 650, course may be repeated for credit. Detailed course descriptions available in the English department office.
Section Comments: Special Topic: Film Noir
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.
Equivalent(s): AMST 605, ENGL 616
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Matthias Konzett
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/30/2021 12/13/2021 TR 3:40pm - 5:00pm HS G35
Additional Course Details: 

 

Top 30 Best Neo-Noir Films, Ranked for Filmmakers

Film Noir and Its Legacy

This course explores contemporary and classical film noir in the context of style and narrative.  As critics Paul Schrader and David Desser have pointed out, film noir is not simply a genre but rather a style that is highly adaptable and hence can be found in various film genres in international and contemporary cinemas.  As a style, noir foregrounds a culture of corruption and may be seen as a critical social narrative.  At the same time, noir also involves aesthetic play with light, water, images of the femme fatale, violence, and crime as its essential ingredients.  Our course will cover classical examples such as Double Indemnity (1944) and a variety of contemporary examples foregrounding different issues such as race (Jackie Brown, 1997), gender (Body  Heat, 1981; Fight Club 1999), community, class and social corruption(Chinatown 1974; In Bruges, 2008), corporate/media culture (Point Blank, 1967; Nightcrawler 2014) nationhood and borders (Touch of Evil, 1958; Sicario, 2015; No Country for Old Men, 2007) and contemporary nihilism and dark comedy (The Big Lebowski, 1998; Sin City, 2005).

This course satisfies the Genre requirement for English Literature majors.

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 618 (01) - Film Theory

Film Theory

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2021 - Full Term (08/30/2021 - 12/13/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 11276
Examines basic theories of film and their relationship to the practice of close analysis of film. Theories are meant to provide students with a vocabulary for critical analysis and stress the many ways of seeing film.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Instructors: Matthias Konzett
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/30/2021 12/13/2021 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm HS G35
Additional Course Details: 

The Matrix Meeting Morpheus Scene HD - YouTube

 

We will examine basic theories of film and their relationship to the practice of “close analysis.” How do film theorists discuss the experience of film, spectatorship, apparatus, and production in a variety of theoretical contexts and explore major film theories such as those of formalism, realism, auteurism, star/celebrity culture, gender, psychoanalysis, genre, race, cultural and media studies? Theories are meant to provide students with a vocabulary for close analysis of film and will stress the many ways of seeing and experiencing film. Our primary responsibility will be finding ways to speak and write about film and its significance as a complex aesthetic and social sign. Film excerpts, particularly those discussed in the assigned texts, will be discussed along with other classic and contemporary films (e.g. Hitchcock's Psycho, Coppola's The Conversation, Garland's Ex Machina, Wes Anderson, Isle of Dogs, etc.)

This course satisfies the Genre requirement for English Literature majors.

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 620 (01) - English Major Internship

English Major Internship

Credits: 1.0 to 4.0
Term: Fall 2021 - Full Term (08/30/2021 - 12/13/2021)
Grade Mode: Credit/Fail Grading
Class Size:   15  
CRN: 10620
Open to all English majors. Internships allow students to use skills learned in the major in a supervised work setting. In addition to the job experience, the English major internship requires research and writing assignments overseen by a faculty sponsor. These supplementary assignments must be outlined in a written proposal describing the work involved in the internship and how it relates to the student's academic training. Registration requires permission from the employer, faculty sponsor, major advisor, and department chairperson. The employer must be an established organization approved by Career Services. This course does not count toward the English major or substitute for English 720, the Journalism Internship. Cr/F.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/30/2021 12/13/2021 Hours Arranged TBA
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 621 (01) - Newswriting

Newswriting

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2021 - Full Term (08/30/2021 - 12/13/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 10057
Students get a strong journalistic foundation with hands-on experience reporting and writing compelling news stories for print and digital platforms. Skills taught include finding news stories and tracking down sources; conducting interviews and verifying facts; and drafting and revising stories. Prereq: ENGL 401, ENGL 534 and permission of the instructor. ENGL 621 may be taken more than once for credit with the approval of the Journalism Program Director, up to a maximum of 8.00 credits. Students must fill out a Permission to Repeat an English Course For Credit form, available in the department office.
Section Comments: Students repeating this course for credit must visit the ENGL department office for a "Repeat for Credit" form.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Tom Haines
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/30/2021 12/13/2021 MW 10:10am - 11:30am HS 104
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 623 (01) - Creative Nonfiction

Creative Nonfiction

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2021 - Full Term (08/30/2021 - 12/13/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 11515
Intensive writing course emphasizing the blend of basic elements that constitute creative nonfiction: research, observation, and personal experience. Also readings and discussion of some of the best published creative nonfiction. Prereq: ENGL 501, 526, 527 or permission of the instructor. May be taken more than once for credit, recommended with two different instructors.
Section Comments: Students repeating this course for credit must visit the ENGL department office for a "Repeat for Credit" form.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Sue Hertz
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/30/2021 12/13/2021 TR 11:10am - 12:30pm HS 104
Additional Course Details: 

Fall 2021 Course Details:

Learn to make facts dance. By employing the imagery of a poet, the drama of a novelist, and the content drive of a journalist, we will craft vivid and compelling and maybe even publishable narratives based on your life and the lives of others. We will study and write both longform and flash, as well as digital forms of CNF. For inspiration, we will read the masters such as Nikesh Shukla, Rebecca Skloot, Jerald Walker, Leslie Jamison, Joe Wilkins, and Jesmyn Ward.  In this class you will hone your storytelling skills, which transfer well to other forms of creative and academic writing, as well as career pursuits. Prerequisite: English 501, 621, 526, 527 or permission of the instructor.** 

In Spring 2021 this course may be used to satisfy a DH (Digital Humanities) requirement for English/TBD majors. 

**Please contact jaed.coffin@unh.edu to request permission to enroll in this course. 

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 625 (01) - Intermediate Fiction Writing Workshop

Intermediate Fiction Workshop

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2021 - Full Term (08/30/2021 - 12/13/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 10058
Students continue to explore the aspects of fiction writing. Through short exercises students learn to create visual scenes, integrate exposition with dramatic scene, and construct convincing characters in believable situations. We'll continue to explore the basic elements of what makes a short story, such as point of view, dialogue, dramatization, voice, meaning, language. Students write short stories and significantly revise them. Through discussion of student writing in a workshop format, as well as reading and responding to short stories by published authors, we'll address the questions: What is a short story? How do we create a world in which the reader is fully involved? Where does the story evoke emotion or meaning? Prereq: ENGL 501, 526, 527 or permission of the instructor. ENGL 625 may be taken more than once for credit, recommended with two different instructors.
Section Comments: Students repeating this course for credit must visit the ENGL department office for a "Repeat for Credit" form.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Thomas Payne
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/30/2021 12/13/2021 R 9:40am - 12:30pm HS 232
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 627 (01) - Intermediate Poetry Writing Workshop

Intermediate Poetry Workshop

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2021 - Full Term (08/30/2021 - 12/13/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 16082
Workshop discussion of poems written by students, with focus on more complex techniques and forms. Individual conferences with instructor. Prereq: ENGL 501, 526, 527 or permission of the instructor. ENGL 627 may be taken more than once for credit, recommended with two different instructors.
Section Comments: Students repeating this course for credit must visit the ENGL department office for a "Repeat for Credit" form.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: David Rivard
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/30/2021 12/13/2021 MW 2:10pm - 3:30pm HS 232
Additional Course Details: 

Fall 2021 Course Details:

The writing and reading of poetry has always been a vital practice for those interested in leadership, innovation, social activism, and psychological awareness.  This workshop will continue the exploration of your imagination through engaging exercises and readings designed to stimulate both the energy and precision of your thinking—no matter what field you are in, it will grow your gift for understanding your life and times creatively and rigorously.  In an age of sensory overload, poetry provides a powerful concentration.  This is not a lecture class.  It offers practical training, and it does so while showing you how poets have written about the widest possible range of human experience—from love to business to medicine to food to politics to dreams to sports and more.  Writing poetry, as Anna Marie Hong says, is a way for us “to connect our lives with the experiences of others, and to change events.”  This workshop will give you the skills to make it happen.  

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 631 (01) - Digital Reporting

Digital Reporting

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2021 - Full Term (08/30/2021 - 12/13/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 12058
This course immerses students in the digital news landscape and teaches them to report across multiple platforms. Students learn reporting tools and strategies for producing dynamic digital journalism. Prereq: ENGL 534, ENGL 621 with a 'B' or better and written permission of the instructor. Writing intensive.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Equivalent(s): ENGL 531
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Joshua Sullivan
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/30/2021 12/13/2021 MW 2:10pm - 3:30pm HS 104
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 657 (01) - Shakespeare

Shakespeare

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2021 - Full Term (08/30/2021 - 12/13/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 10061
An introduction to the main periods of Shakespeare's playwriting career, addressing representative works from each of the genres in which he wrote (tragedy, comedy, history, romance). We will discuss such matters as a Renaissance theater architecture and performance conventions, Shakespeare's poetic language, the representation of women, commoners and minorities on stage, royal power and court politics, love, sex, religion, and revenge. Live and filmed performances will be included as available. Prereq: ENGL 401.
Section Comments: Satisfies DH requirement for English TBD majors in Fall 2021
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Equivalent(s): ENGL 657H
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Douglas Lanier
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/30/2021 12/13/2021 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm HS 240
Additional Course Details: 

This course satisfies a Pre-1800 Literature requirement for English Department majors.

In Fall 2021 this course satisfies the DH (Digital Humanities) requirement for English: TBD majors. 

Manchester   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 657 (M1) - Shakespeare

Shakespeare

Online Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Can be taken by students who are remote.
Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2021 - UNHM Credit (15 weeks) (08/30/2021 - 12/13/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   15  
CRN: 16563
An introduction to the main periods of Shakespeare's playwriting career, addressing representative works from each of the genres in which he wrote (tragedy, comedy, history, romance). We will discuss such matters as a Renaissance theater architecture and performance conventions, Shakespeare's poetic language, the representation of women, commoners and minorities on stage, royal power and court politics, love, sex, religion, and revenge. Live and filmed performances will be included as available. Prereq: ENGL 401.
Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Equivalent(s): ENGL 657H
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Susanne Paterson
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/30/2021 12/13/2021 M 6:01pm - 9:00pm ONLINE
Additional Course Details: 

THIS CLASS WILL BE TAUGHT ONLINE (there will be no change in modality).  Students on the Durham as well as the Manchester campus are welcome to enroll. 

DESCRIPTION:

This course will offer you the opportunity to get to know some of the plays written by William Shakespeare. Viewing them very much as products of their social, historical, and literary environments, we will focus on nine of his plays. These plays present a diverse picture of Early Modern theatrical production.

 

The plays have been selected because, when read together, they present the audience with both a sense of continuity and of contradiction. They explore generic boundaries, engaging with the concept of Aristotelian tragedy and producing hybrid tragic forms, such as tragicomedy; they also sometimes offer (to our eyes) a startlingly modern understanding of issues such as gender, as in The Taming of the Shrew. Furthermore, the plays explore and complicate an array of themes which reflect the concerns of the Early Modern period in England, many of which still preoccupy us today: among other things, the position and perception of "outsiders" in contemporary society, how to reconcile a person's appearance with their true identity, the place of women in family life, the ramifications of madness and love.

 

As we read these plays we will gain a greater understanding not just of dramatic form, but also of aspects of Early Modern British society. To this end, I've supplemented the primary readings with a text which helps you gain a broader picture of the historical moment in which these dramas were written and staged.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

David Bevington, ed. The Necessary Shakespeare. 3rd ed. (New York: Pearson Longman, 2009). ISBN-10: 0205652166; ISBN-13: 978-0205652167

Russ McDonald, ed. The Bedford Companion to Shakespeare, 2nd edition (NY: Bedford St. Martin's, 2001). ISBN-10: 0312248806; ISBN-13: 978-0312248802