Timeroom: Spring 2021

Displaying 651 - 660 of 1722 Results for: Attributes = EUNH
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 894 (1SY) - Syntax

Syntax

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online with some campus visits, EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   3  
CRN: 50931
The relationship of grammar and meaning as viewed from the standpoint of modern linguistic theory. Emphasis on the syntax and semantics of English, with special attention to the construction of arguments for or against particular analyses. (Also offered as ENGL/LING 794). Prereq: a basic linguistic course or permission of the instructor.
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Instructors: Rochelle Lieber
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 T 9:40am - 11:00am HS 108
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 R 9:40am - 11:00am ONLINE
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 896 (1SY) - The Internship Experience

The Internship Experience

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   5  
CRN: 54372
Students work with their peers to establish a personal definition of professionalism in their respective fields; they will read, critically analyze, and discuss articles covering a wide variety of topics, including writing at work, intended audiences, navigating a difficult work environment or situation, and strategies for professional development. Class sessions in a discussion format, intended to be flexible and to directly support the changing needs of writing in the workplace. Students, along with their supervisors, will create their own learning objectives and evaluation tools. Students will write about their experiences at the end of term. Prereqs: ENGL 419 and ENGL 502 or ENGL 602. Minimum GPA 3.0 required for registration. FR/SO status students excluded. Not open to ENGL/Journalism or ENGL Teaching majors.
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Instructors: Molly Campbell
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 W 3:40pm - 6:30pm ONLINE
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 912 (1SY) - Historical and Theoretical Studies in Rhetoric

Hist & Theor Studies Rhetoric

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   10  
CRN: 56101
The rhetorical tradition in Western culture, with a special focus on three critical periods: the classical period (Aristotle, Cicero, Quintillian), the eighteenth century (Blair and Campbell), and the modern era (Burke, Booth, Perelman, Ong, Weaver).
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Instructors: Cristy Beemer
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 T 2:10pm - 5:00pm ONLINE
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 935 (1SY) - Seminar: Studies in American Literature

Sem/Studies Americn Literature

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   10  
CRN: 57063
May be repeated.
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Instructors: Reginald Wilburn
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 M 3:10pm - 6:00pm ONLINE
Additional Course Details: 
"To Hell with Milton in African American Literature" This 900-level course considers the role of John Milton's often (in)visible influential presence in creative works by diverse African American poets and novelists. In addition to understanding the art of intertextual sampling in African American fiction and poetry, this course will specifically engage with Milton's "Satanic epic" as unorthodox intertexts signaling black revolt, freedom, justice, equality, and citizenship via diverse writers' "uppity" receptions of Paradise Lost. We will evaluate these rhetorics of freedom and black cultural responses to Milton's signature epic in the English language as a pedagogical route for causing "good and necessary trouble" with race in the English classroom. Close readings, spirited class discussions, exercises in the teaching of African American literature, and a final paper of original research will equip 21st century graduate students to make startling (re)discoveries as cutting-edge researchers. This portfolio of work also will prepare 21st-century graduate students to be transformative teachers for the future generations of students they shall teach in social climates where black lives and the politics of freedom have and must always matter.
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 937 (1SY) - Seminar: Studies in 19th Century American Literature

Sem/19th C American Literature

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   10  
CRN: 56100
May be repeated.
Section Comments: Special Topic: TBA
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Instructors: Brigitte Bailey
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 W 9:10am - 12:00pm ONLINE
Additional Course Details: 

Seminar.  Studies in Nineteenth-Century American Literature: National Space in Early Republican and Antebellum Writings

This seminar will consider texts in the period, 1790-1865, as expressions integrally involved in the cultural work of nation-building and in the project of imagining nationally significant spaces. In this era of self-conscious effort to create a “national” literature, writers negotiate an imperative to situate—to locate—the abstractly conceived and non-geographically defined republic. We will examine representations of domestic, pastoral, urban, and “wilderness” spaces in characteristic genres of the time: predominantly fiction, but also lyric poetry, architecture and domestic manuals, a slave narrative, urban journalism, and an “excursion” into nature. And we’ll consider the figures—citizens and non-citizens—positioned in and by these spaces. The course will engage critical readings from the fields of cultural geography, gender and race studies, ecocriticism, history, architectural and visual studies, as well as literary criticism. Texts may include: Charles Brockden Brown’s Arthur Mervyn, Catharine Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie; Or, Early Times in the Massachusetts, Andrew Jackson Downing’s The Architecture of Country Houses, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Blithedale Romance, Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Henry David Thoreau’s Walden and Civil Disobedience, Henry Bibb’s The Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb: An American Slave, and Fanny Fern’s Ruth Hall. Oral reports, a short mid-semester paper, and a 20-page seminar paper.

Durham   Life Sciences & Agriculture :: Environmental&Resource Econ

EREC 411 (1ON) - Environmental and Resource Economics Perspectives

Envrnmntl&Res Econ Perspectves

Course Delivery Method: Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   68  
CRN: 50815
Microeconomic theory and analysis in resource management and use decisions. Survey of significant resource problems from an economic perspective and the application of economic analysis.
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Mutual Exclusion : ECN 412, ECN 412W, ECON 402, ECON 402A, ECON 402H
Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)
Instructors: Alberto Manalo
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 Hours Arranged ONLINE
Durham   Life Sciences & Agriculture :: Environmental&Resource Econ

EREC 411 (2ON) - Environmental and Resource Economics Perspectives

Envrnmntl&Res Econ Perspectves

Course Delivery Method: Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   80  
CRN: 52294
Microeconomic theory and analysis in resource management and use decisions. Survey of significant resource problems from an economic perspective and the application of economic analysis.
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Mutual Exclusion : ECN 412, ECN 412W, ECON 402, ECON 402A, ECON 402H
Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)
Instructors: John Halstead
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 Hours Arranged ONLINE
Durham   Life Sciences & Agriculture :: Environmental&Resource Econ

EREC 756 (1SY) - Rural and Regional Economic Development

Rural & Regional Econ Develop

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   22  
CRN: 55892
Concepts and methods of delineating regional economies, methods of measuring activity, regional development, and public policies. Emphasizes empirical research studies. Prereq: intermediate economic theory or permission. Writing intensive.
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Equivalent(s): RECO 756
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: John Halstead
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 MWF 1:10pm - 2:00pm ONLINE
Durham   Engineering&Physical Sciences :: Earth Sciences

ESCI 402 (1HY) - Earth History

Earth History

Course Delivery Method: Online with some campus visits, EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   16  
CRN: 50045
Course provides knowledge and skills necessary to interpret, understand, and appreciate the Earth's 4.6 billion-year history. The first third of the course introduces basic principles, including geological materials, plate tectonics, geological time, fossil preservation, and biological evolution. The remainder of the course tells the story of Earth history through case studies that illustrate scientific methods used to reconstruct critical events in our planet's evolution through time. Topics include the origin of the Earth, the Cambrian explosion of life, building of the Appalachians, assembly of Pangaea, the rise and fall of dinosaurs, the formation of the Rocky Mountains, mammalian evolution, human origins, and Pleistocene glaciation. Students gain experience in making geological observations through laboratory exercises and during one afternoon field trip. Special fee. Lab.
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Attributes: Physical Science(Discovery), Discovery Lab Course
Instructors: Alia Lesnek
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 Hours Arranged ONLINE
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 M 1:10pm - 3:30pm JAMS 240