Timeroom: Spring 2021

Displaying 631 - 640 of 1722 Results for: Attributes = EUNH
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 726L (1SY) - Sem in English Teaching: Lab

Sem in English Teaching: Lab

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 2.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Credit/Fail Grading
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 54023
Classroom and research lab experiences give English Teaching majors enrolled in the Seminar in English Teaching opportunities to put their pedagogical and theoretical readings into practice and grow as teachers. This lab should be taken simultaneously with ENGL 726. Students must have JR or SR status at the start of the course. Permission of instructor required.
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Co-Requisite: ENGL 726
Equivalent(s): ENGL 892S
Classes not allowed in section: Freshman, Sophomore
Instructors: Alecia Magnifico
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 M 5:10pm - 8:00pm ONLINE
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 729 (1SY) - Special Topics in Composition Studies

Spec Top/Composition Studies

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   6  
CRN: 57061
Advanced course on a topic chosen by the instructor. Precise topics and methods of each section vary. Possible topics include alternative discourses and rhetorics, contrastive rhetoric, electronic discourse and digital rhetoric, women's rhetorics and feminist pedagogies, Montaigne and the essay tradition, theories of literacy, theories of persuasive writing, theories of transactional writing, and written discourse analysis. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. For details see descriptions available in the English Department. Writing intensive when topic is studies in rhetoric and composition.
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Classes not allowed in section: Freshman
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 F 11:10am - 2:00pm ONLINE
Additional Course Details: 

Writing for Nonprofits and Communities

Nonprofit organizations work on behalf of their causes and communities, and every year, nonprofits, as a whole, generate millions of dollars to fund this work. These kinds of organizations rely on a mix of financial resources to fund their work including donors, fundraising events, appeals to legislators, and grants. Given this reality, effective writing strategies are essential for these organizations, and they are often in need of effective writers to promote their work, write for grants, solicit donations, and educate legislators and the public alike. For students aiming to work in university and college settings, a working knowledge and understanding of writing for nonprofits/grants can be an important skill set to bring to their future workplaces.

Through readings, writing and analytic activities (including the examination of grant applications and sample writing materials from nonprofits), interactions with local nonprofit groups, projects, and guest speakers, students in this course will:

  • Gain an understanding of the goals and missions of non-profit and other community organizations. We will also consider the grant-writing activities undertaken by these groups.
  • Gain an understanding of the texts such organizations use in order to achieve their goals and mission, including an understanding of genres, conventions, rhetorical strategies, and writing processes.
  • Acquire and practice using rhetorical strategies that appropriately address the exigencies, audiences, and purposes non-profit professionals face.
  • Gain specific writing and communication skills that can aid you in nonprofit/grant activities for workplaces, grant activities, or volunteer work.
  • Make connections with professionals in the non-profit community.

ENGL 729 is open to juniors and seniors with an interest in writing and nonprofit work.  This is a writing intensive course.

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 756 (1SY) - Chaucer

Chaucer

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 56103
Geoffrey Chaucer is one of the most famous poets in the English language - but why? This course offers students and overview of Chaucer's poetry, spending particular time on his masterpiece, "The Canterbury Tales". Sometimes tragic, sometimes bawdy, and almost always humorous, Chaucer?s poetry offers a glimpse of a world long-lost, while simultaneously forcing us to ask hard questions about justice, love, and the nature of human creation. Prereq: ENGL 401.
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Classes not allowed in section: Freshman
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Samantha Seal
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm ONLINE
Additional Course Details: 

This course satisfies a Pre-1800 literature requirement for English Department majors. 

In Spring 2021, this course satisfies a DH (Digital Humanities) requirement for English/TBD majors. 

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 773 (1SY) - Literary Modernisms: Return, Revolt, Recycle

Literary Modernisms

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Can be taken by students who are remote.
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 56129
This course focuses on modernist writers such as T.S. Eliot, who sought to revitalize modern culture by looking backward to the past; Virginia Woolf, who experimented with the form of the novel; and performance artist Kabe Wilson, who recycles texts of high modernism. We explore modernist literature in its geopolitical contexts with special attention to imperial expansion and contraction, the rise of fascism, world wars, and struggles for suffrage, and national belonging. Prereq: ENGL 401.
Section Comments: Satisfies the DH/Digital Humanities requirement for ENGL/TBD majors in SP21.
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Classes not allowed in section: Freshman
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Robin Hackett
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 TR 11:10am - 12:30pm ONLINE
Additional Course Details: 

Literary Modernisms: Return, Revolt, Recycle

English 773

This course, OFFERED REMOTELY, focuses on the art and literature of modernity, a literary period with contested boundaries. We will discuss experimental poets including T.S. Eliot, who sought to revitalize what he thought of as effete modern culture by looking backward to the past. We will read fiction by Virginia Woolf, whose experiments with literary form were also challenges to patriarchal institutions. We will read late modernists such as Kabe Wilson, a 21st century performance artist who recycles texts of high modernism and turns his gaze toward imperial culture. In class discussions, we will explore the cultural and geopolitical contexts in which literary experiments were made, including imperial expansion and contraction, the rise of fascism, world wars, struggles for suffrage, and struggles over national belonging. Additional authors of major focus will include: Claude McKay, W.B. Yeats., Chinua Achebe, Gertrude Stein, Monique Truong, Seamus Heaney, and poets and writers of WW1. 

This course satisfies a Post-1800 Literature requirement for English Department majors.  

In Spring 2021 this course satisfies a DH (Digital Humanities) requirement for English TBD majors. 

Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 779 (1SY) - Linguistic Field Methods

Linguistic Field Methods

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online with some campus visits, EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   5  
CRN: 51335
Special Fees: $12.00
Study of a non-Indo-European language by eliciting examples from an informant, rather than from written descriptions of the language. Students learn how to figure out the grammar of a language from raw data. Prereq: ENGL 405/LING 405. (Also offered as LING 779). (Not offered every semester).
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Equivalent(s): LING 779
Classes not allowed in section: Freshman, Sophomore
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Rachel Burdin
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 T 11:10am - 12:30pm ONLINE
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 R 11:10am - 12:30pm HS 108
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 787 (1SY) - English Major Seminar

Sem/Lit of Cabin in the Woods

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   15  
CRN: 51000
This Capstone course offers you an opportunity to study a specialized topic in depth in a seminar format. Enrollment is limited to 15 so that you can take active part in discussion and work closely with the instructor on a research project. Topics vary from semester to semester. Recent topics include Tragedy, Comedy, American Women Poets, Medicine in Literature, and Feminist Print Culture. Pre-req: ENGL 419 with a grade of B or better. Barring duplication of subject, course may be repeated for credit. For details see semester specific course descriptions available in the English Department.
Section Comments: Topic: Lit of Cabin in the Woods
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Equivalent(s): ENGL 787R
Classes not allowed in section: Freshman
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Diane Freedman
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 MW 5:10pm - 6:30pm ONLINE
Additional Course Details: 

Cabin in the Woods

787 English Major Seminar The Cabin in the Woods M W 5:10-6:30. Online.

Professor Diane Freedman

            Beginning with Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, or Life in the Woods (1854), this seminar will  explore the tradition of Walden in American life and culture, with a focus on selected literary works and literary practices clearly inspired by it. Active in-class discussion, some lectures, presentations, short response papers, and a final research paper. Authors from among the following: Thoreau, Louise Erdrich, Annie Dillard, Julia Corbett, May Sarton, Bernd Heinrich, Henry Beston, Ian Marshall, John Haines, Sue Hubbell, Anne LaBastille, Wyman Richardson, Cynthia Huntington, Tom Montgomery Fate, E.B. White, Lou Ureneck, and/or others. While the authors on our reading list almost all speak of literal houses or cabins in which they sought a writerly solitude, perhaps any absorbing book can be thought of itself as a cabin. Or solitary space. Or what you propose stands as such (a hammock? A train compartment for a traveling writer? a favorite restaurant booth?)

            What can emerge from a sojourn or several in cabin and woods, for author and readers? Though we will read almost exclusively prose, suggestions for other expressive outcomes are welcome in our discussions. Moreover, what thoughts of self, others, community, and/as environment emerge? What common styles and strategies of writing? How might gender, race, age, stage, location, time spent, weather/conditions, connected activities and the like affect that writing and the thinking? How do our authors and we variously come to understand nature, retreat, home, being-at-home, solitude, self-reliance, sustainability ?

            Further: Has each writer in turn honored the presumed memoir “pact”(in a work purportedly non-fiction or autobiographical poetry) of telling the truth to the best of his/her/their knowledge and ability?  How do we know? What messages and details come down to us about observing, understanding, interacting with, and advocating for nature or specific places and living things?  Why have there been so many of these types of books? What dangers are equated with a writer’s solitude and retreat from society, from technology, from institutions, from relationships?  (Think woman alone in the wilderness, think aversion, avoidance, denial, hermit, misanthrope, loneliness.)  Does time spent in a writers’ colony abrogate this myth or mission of the solitary writer? If, as E.B. White also asserts, Walden is not (as advertised) the simple and sincere account of a life in the woods but instead an account of a “journey into the mind,” and we compare other course memoirs with Thoreau’s, what can we then conclude about the role of reflection (or “telling”) versus action (or “showing”) in a memoir or “year of” account?  What can we conclude about the mind of writers insisting on writing about place and living, if only temporarily, at a sub-modern pace (while nonetheless assuming dissemination of the result of their experiment to those not similarly off the grid)? Questions or suggestions: Diane.Freedman@unh.edu. This course satisfies post-1900 and Capstone requirements requirements in the English majors (and the seminar requirement for honors in English) and can count towards Women’s Studies and/or American Studies majors and minors. Besides English majors and minors, this course is open to student in various Environmental studies or science programs and interested others and counts towards the Dual Sustainability major. WI.

This course satisfies a Post-1800 literature requirement for English Department Majors. 

This course may be taken for Capstone credit by English majors; please fill out a Capstone Declaration Form. Contact the ENGL Main Office for assistance: 603-862-1313.

This course may count towards Women's Studies and/or American Studies majors &  minors. 

Freshman excluded. Writing Intensive. 

Manchester   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 792 (M1) - Teaching Literature and Literacy

Teaching Literature & Literacy

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - UNHM Credit (15 weeks) (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   10  
CRN: 53322
This course introduces theories and practices of teaching literature and literacy, including teaching reading and writing as well as teaching literary analysis at the secondary level. Students also learn to plan lessons, choose texts, and create learning activities for speaking, listening, and viewing in grade five through twelve. The course is designed for students who are interested in teaching as a possible career.
Section Comments: Cross listed with ENGL 892
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 R 9:01am - 11:50am ONLINE
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 794 (1SY) - Syntax

Syntax

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online with some campus visits, EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   3  
CRN: 56128
Relationship of grammar and meaning as viewed from the standpoint of modern linguistic theory. Emphasizes the syntax and semantics of English, with special attention to the construction of arguments for or against particular analyses. (Also offered as LING 794.) Prereq: a basic linguistics course or permission of the instructor. Writing intensive.
Section Comments: Also listed as LING 794, ENGL 894.
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Rochelle Lieber
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 T 9:40am - 11:00am HS 108
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 R 9:40am - 11:00am ONLINE
Durham   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 796 (1SY) - The Internship Experience

Internship Experience

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - Full Term (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   10  
CRN: 54924
Students work with their peers to establish a personal definition of professionalism in their respective fields; they will read, critically analyze, and discuss articles covering a wide variety of topics, including writing at work, intended audiences, navigating a difficult work environment or situation, and strategies for professional development. Class sessions in a discussion format, intended to be flexible and to directly support the changing needs of writing in the workplace. Students, along with their supervisors, will create their own learning objectives and evaluation tools. Students will write about their experiences at the end of term. Prereqs: ENGL 419 and ENGL 502 or ENGL 602. Minimum GPA 3.0 required for registration. FR/SO status students excluded. Not open to ENGL/Journalism or ENGL Teaching majors.
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Equivalent(s): ENGL 695
Classes not allowed in section: Freshman
Instructors: Molly Campbell
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 W 3:40pm - 6:30pm ONLINE
Manchester   Liberal Arts :: English

ENGL 797 (M1) - Special Studies in Literature

SpcStdy/Women Behaving Badly

Course Delivery Method: Scheduled meeting time, Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2021 - UNHM Credit (15 weeks) (02/01/2021 - 05/11/2021)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   9  
CRN: 56481
A) Old English Literature, B) Medieval Literature, C) 16th Century, D) 17th Century, E) 18th Century, f) English Romantic Period, G) Victorian Period, H) 20th Century, I) Drama, J) Novel, K) Poetry, L) Non-fiction, M) American Literature, N) A Literary Problem, O) Literature of the Renaissance, R) Race and Racial Theories. The precise topics and methods of each section vary. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. For details, see the course descriptions available in the English department.
Section Comments: Cross listed with HUMA 730/ENGL 800
You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Classes not allowed in section: Freshman
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Susanne Paterson
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
2/1/2021 5/11/2021 M 9:01am - 11:50am ONLINE
Additional Course Details: 

Women who behave badly in early drama take murderous revenge on their betrayers; manipulate their husbands; defy the wishes of their families; and deceive their communities. They also strive to choose their own paths in life, by whatever means they can, sometimes cutting truly frightening figures, sometimes showing admirable strength and fortitude.

Reading and viewing a variety of tragedies and comedies, including Euripides's Medea, Shakespeare's Macbeth, Aristophanes's Lysistrata and Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew, we will scrutinize these women's actions and place them in their historical and social contexts. By examining women's roles in Ancient Greece, Roman Italy, and Renaissance and Restoration England, we will gain a sense of how these female characters' behaviors on the stage aligned with expectations in society at the time. What did it mean to society and to audiences of drama for a woman to choose her own marriage partner, or for her to reject the duties of a wife and daughter? And how do these women's dramatic actions help us understand our own actions more fully?

This course fulfills the pre-1800 requirement and the Capstone requirements for the Literary Studies major; it fulfills and upper-division course for Humanities; and it will fulfill the Capstone requirement for English Teaching. It is Writing Intensive. All majors are welcome.