Timeroom: Fall 2020

Displaying 21 - 30 of 97 Results for: Campus = Law

LCR 924 (1ON) - International Criminal Law and Justice Seminar

Internatl Criminal Law Survey

Course Delivery Method: Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Law (08/24/2020 - 12/18/2020)
Class Size:   15  
CRN: 17327
This is a research and writing seminar that satisfies the Upper Level Writing Requirement. This seminar is REQUIRED for all students seeking the LLM or Interdisciplinary Master's degree in International Criminal Law and Justice. Students will be required to conduct original research and writing, with multiple edits, on a topic to be agreed upon with the instructor. Students will present their research to the class. Eligibility: Open to all except 1Ls. REQUIRED for ALL students seeking the LLM or Masters in International Criminal Law and Justice. Course enrollment is limited to 14 students. Course format: writing. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course cannot be taken for an S/U grade.
Instructors: Robert McDaniel
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/24/2020 12/18/2020 Hours Arranged ONLINE

LCR 925 (1ON) - Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

Comparative Crimnl Just Sytems

Course Delivery Method: Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Law (08/24/2020 - 12/18/2020)
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 13475
Only a small portion of international criminal law disputes are resolved in some form of international court like the International Criminal Court or a special tribunal. The majority are instead resolved in a domestic court system, meaning that, effectively, the practice of international criminal law occurs in a number of different criminal justice systems. This course familiarizes students with the varieties of criminal justice systems around the world. Though each country or region has its own individual system tailored to its history and culture, regional and cultural similarities exist in the structure and approach of individual systems. The course will ground students in the major types of criminal justice systems around the world, from the Anglo-American system to a European system to an Islamic system. The course will look both at individual systems from countries that have a strong presence in the world of international criminal law and at the general principles that underlie the differences in major systems.
Instructors: Philip Reichel
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/24/2020 12/18/2020 Hours Arranged ONLINE

LCR 927 (1ON) - Piracy and Terrorism

Piracy and Terrorism

Course Delivery Method: Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 2.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Law (08/24/2020 - 12/18/2020)
Class Size:   10  
CRN: 13473
This course will explore the law and practice relating to crimes of terrorism and piracy. We will explore how states have come to define and prosecute these crimes and the subsequent implications for individual liberties, international norms, and the ever evolving role of the state in protecting national security. Course materials will include treaties, statutes, case law, historical essays, contemporary commentary and news articles, executive orders, and other works. We will cover various themes including: competing international and domestic definitions of the crimes of terrorism and piracy; the law governing states? jurisdiction to prosecute such crimes; the nexus between terrorism and piracy and the laws of armed conflict?such as that governing detention, trials, and targeted killing; as well as the law governing surveillance for counter-terrorism purposes and the anti-piracy efforts of non-state actors. The course will focus on contemporary U.S. law and policy, but will also provide historical context.
Instructors: Heather Brandon-Bravo
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/24/2020 12/18/2020 Hours Arranged ONLINE

LCR 929 (1ON) - Capstone Research Project

Capstone Research Project

Course Delivery Method: Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Law (08/24/2020 - 12/18/2020)
Class Size:   3  
CRN: 14430
This course serves as the capstone to the process begun with the International Criminal Law Survey course. Students will complete a significant research and writing project on a subject of their choice under the supervision of a faculty member. The project will include a set of deadlines for outlines and drafts as well as frequent interaction with the Professor. The emphasis will be on a product reflective of a significant analytical effort rather than a merely broad descriptive one.
Instructors: Albert Scherr
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/24/2020 12/18/2020 Hours Arranged ONLINE

LDWS 902 (01) - DWS Business Transactions

Business Transactions

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Law (08/24/2020 - 12/18/2020)
Class Size:   24  
CRN: 12998
Business Transactions is a 3-L course offered to students enrolled in the Daniel Webster Scholars program. The course exposes students to a range of business transactions including business formation, management, dissolution and sale, as well as how to handle common matters which small businesses will likely encounter, such as creating financing documents, promissory notes, security agreements, mortgages, real estate closings, the foreclosure process, non-compete agreements, mechanics' liens, as well as other transactions. Students will negotiate solutions to ten different simulated transactions and business problems, and draft appropriate documents to implement the solutions they negotiate with opposing counsel. Eligibility: Required DWS course. Course format: simulation. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course cannot be taken for an S/U grade. Office
Instructors: Peter Wright
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/24/2020 12/18/2020 MW 11:00am - 12:15pm UNHL 205

LDWS 942 (01) - DWS Pretrial Advocacy

Pretrial Advocacy

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Law (08/24/2020 - 12/18/2020)
Class Size:   11  
CRN: 12999
Pretrial Advocacy is a 2-L simulation course. Each of the two sections is a law firm. Each firm has an experienced litigator/professor in the role of "senior partner," and the 2L scholars are "junior associates." There are also two 3L scholars in each firm who serve as "senior associates". Actors play the roles of the parties and various witnesses. Working both in small groups and alone, the junior associates: interview clients and witnesses; prepare or answer a complaint; prepare and answer interrogatories; take and defend a deposition with an actual court reporter who takes it in "real time" and provides a transcript; prepare a motion or an objection to a motion for summary judgment which is then argued before a real judge in the judge's courtroom; and prepare a final pretrial statement for submission to the court. Throughout the semester, the "junior associates" also submit time sheets to their "senior partners." "Junior associates" receive constructive feedback from their "senior partners," "senior associates," and each other, as well as from court reporters, judges, attorneys, standardized clients and witnesses. They also observe and critique their taped deposition and oral argument performances. At the end of the course, each scholar prepares a reflective paper in which, using the MacCrate skills and values as a guide, the student identifies those skills and values that were addressed in the course, reflects upon the student's own perceived strengths and weaknesses, and discusses how the student plans to cultivate strengths and improve weaknesses. Eligibility: Required DWS course. Non-DWS students may apply by lottery. Course enrollment is limited to 20 students. Course format: simulation. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course cannot be taken for an S/U grade.
Instructors: Emily Rice, Courtney Brooks
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/24/2020 12/18/2020 T 8:00am - 9:50am UNHL 228
8/24/2020 12/18/2020 R 5:30pm - 7:20pm UNHL 228

LDWS 942 (02) - DWS Pretrial Advocacy

Pretrial Advocacy

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Law (08/24/2020 - 12/18/2020)
Class Size:   12  
CRN: 13000
Pretrial Advocacy is a 2-L simulation course. Each of the two sections is a law firm. Each firm has an experienced litigator/professor in the role of "senior partner," and the 2L scholars are "junior associates." There are also two 3L scholars in each firm who serve as "senior associates". Actors play the roles of the parties and various witnesses. Working both in small groups and alone, the junior associates: interview clients and witnesses; prepare or answer a complaint; prepare and answer interrogatories; take and defend a deposition with an actual court reporter who takes it in "real time" and provides a transcript; prepare a motion or an objection to a motion for summary judgment which is then argued before a real judge in the judge's courtroom; and prepare a final pretrial statement for submission to the court. Throughout the semester, the "junior associates" also submit time sheets to their "senior partners." "Junior associates" receive constructive feedback from their "senior partners," "senior associates," and each other, as well as from court reporters, judges, attorneys, standardized clients and witnesses. They also observe and critique their taped deposition and oral argument performances. At the end of the course, each scholar prepares a reflective paper in which, using the MacCrate skills and values as a guide, the student identifies those skills and values that were addressed in the course, reflects upon the student's own perceived strengths and weaknesses, and discusses how the student plans to cultivate strengths and improve weaknesses. Eligibility: Required DWS course. Non-DWS students may apply by lottery. Course enrollment is limited to 20 students. Course format: simulation. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course cannot be taken for an S/U grade.
Instructors: Pamela Phelan
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/24/2020 12/18/2020 T 8:00am - 9:50am UNHL 201
8/24/2020 12/18/2020 R 5:30pm - 7:20pm UNHL 201

LGP 900 (09) - The Legal Profession

The Legal Profession

Credits: 1.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Law Hybrid (08/24/2020 - 12/18/2020)
Class Size:   45  
CRN: 13017
In this course, students acquire a basic understanding of the numerous career paths available to lawyers, explore basic concepts of legal professionalism, understand the fundamentals of the business of law, practice the ?soft skills? necessary for effective lawyering, and develop an individual career development strategy for exploring their unique professional interests throughout the next three years. During classes, students meet practitioners from a variety of practice areas. The attorneys address various business and professional issues they handle on a daily basis so that students can begin to discern not only the legal and business issues in different legal practices, but also the professional standards that attorneys will expect of them in the workplace. During a portion of each class, students apply the information they learned from the attorneys to a practical aspect of their own professional development. Students also research and establish a mentoring relationship with a practitioner, attend networking events, participate in community service projects, attend additional events, meetings, and conferences and practice other ?soft skills? as requirements of the course. This class meets for two hours every other week. Students are expected to complete several specific written assignments. Grading is S/U and is based on attendance, participation and satisfactory completion of all projects and written assignments. This is a required 1L course.
Instructors: Paul Kroon Jr.
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/24/2020 12/18/2020 Hours Arranged TBA

LGP 903 (01) - Administrative Process

Administrative Process

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Law (08/24/2020 - 12/18/2020)
Class Size:   80  
CRN: 12980
Administrative law is the law of how government agencies operate. Topics covered include the mechanisms through which agencies act, the constitutional constraints on their actions, and the ways in which the executive, legislative, and judicial branches can exercise oversight and control over those actions. By the end of this course, students should be prepared to identify and analyze the stages of administrative rulemaking and adjudications; apply constitutional doctrines that constrain agencies such as due process, nondelegation, and separation of powers; and apply statutory and constitutional doctrines governing administrative actions and judicial review of those actions.
Instructors: Roger Allan Ford
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/24/2020 12/18/2020 MW 12:30pm - 1:45pm UNHL 204

LGP 903 (1ON) - Administrative Process

Administrative Process

Course Delivery Method: Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Law (08/24/2020 - 12/18/2020)
Class Size:   24  
CRN: 17395
Administrative law is the law of how government agencies operate. Topics covered include the mechanisms through which agencies act, the constitutional constraints on their actions, and the ways in which the executive, legislative, and judicial branches can exercise oversight and control over those actions. By the end of this course, students should be prepared to identify and analyze the stages of administrative rulemaking and adjudications; apply constitutional doctrines that constrain agencies such as due process, nondelegation, and separation of powers; and apply statutory and constitutional doctrines governing administrative actions and judicial review of those actions.
Instructors: Kenneth Randall
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/24/2020 12/18/2020 Hours Arranged ONLINE