Timeroom: Fall 2019

Displaying 51 - 60 of 96 Results for: Campus = Law

LGP 960 (02) - Torts

Torts

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   50  
CRN: 13437
Torts exposes you to the fundamentals of the major tort doctrines, focusing primarily on negligence and introducing intentional torts and products liability. Through reading primary authorities - cases and statutes - and secondary authorities such as the Restatement of Torts, jury instructions, and related materials, you will learn legal principles. Working on skills-based exercises, you will practice analyzing and applying torts principles to factual scenarios. During the course you will show in writing and orally how lawyers solve problems in the area of torts - what laws they use, how they apply them to new facts, and how they use those facts to make arguments to judges or juries. To successfully complete this course you will: 1. Analyze and synthesize cases; 2. Solve legal problems; 3. Investigate facts; 4. Make legal arguments; 5. Understand how to access information related to tort law; 6. Think critically about law, policy and the torts system; 7. Draft legal documents that communicate clearly, are persuasive, and comply with applicable rules; 8. Learn: A. The basic law and policy of torts: negligence, intentional torts and products liability; B. Which tort issues are decided by judges, which by juries (or judges sitting as fact finders); C. The interrelationship of different torts causes of actions; and 9. Participate professionally in class. Eligibility: Required JD course. Course format: problem-based. This course is recommended for taking the bar exam. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course cannot be taken for an S/U grade.
Instructors: Sophie Sparrow
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 MW 1:00pm - 2:30pm UNHL 229

LGP 972 (01) - Valuation and the Law

Valuation and the Law

Credits: 2.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   35  
CRN: 16012
Valuation is a prerequisite for thoughtful decision-making. The old management adage?you can?t manage what you don?t measure?remains true today. In business, sound decision-making involves placing reasonable values on assets and strategies to identify the best decisions among competing, but uncertain, choices. While valuation has long been used by businesses to improve decisions, it has been slow to develop as a wide-ranging decision tool in the legal setting. As a result, valuation principles are too often ignored or poorly implemented in legal settings. Valuation should be a fundamental skill possessed by most lawyers. Consider just a few of the legal settings that require valuation to make properly informed decisions: ? Developing remedies in the litigation context. ? Making sue-or-settle decisions. ? Crafting effective laws and regulations. ? Determining how much to spend on legal services. ? Developing and executing business strategies that are based on legal rights (such as intellectual property strategies). ? Evaluating the success or failure of negotiations. In each of these contexts, the decision-maker must make a value judgment (the option chosen is better than options not chosen), whether the decision-maker appreciates it or not. For example, when a client decides to settle a lawsuit, she has valued the settlement alternative higher than the litigation alternative. Therefore, the choice is not whether to employ a valuation analysis. Rather, the choice is whether to employ an intelligent valuation analysis that helps inform the decision or to employ a sloppy process that ignores such valuable information. One reason (and probably the most powerful reason) for the slow development of valuation analysis in the legal setting is the common misperception that valuation is too difficult. This course will seek to disprove that notion. This course will teach students how to apply valuation principles in their future legal practice and become more effective lawyers. Strong math skills are not required. We will not employ any mathematical concepts beyond what is required in a 6th grade math class.
Instructors: John Orcutt
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 R 9:00am - 11:00am UNHL 200

LGP 987 (1ON) - Int'l Business Transactions

Int'l Business Transactions

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/15/2019 - 12/17/2019)
Class Size:   15  
CRN: 17505
International Business Transactions is a general course covering the fundamental issues that affect business in today?s global marketplace. Topics covered include legal issues associated with financing commercial transactions, transnational contracts, and foreign direct investment in countries abroad. The course will emphasize the role of international trade institutions, GATT treaties, and federal trade law.
Instructors: Daniel Chow
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/15/2019 12/17/2019 Hours Arranged ONLINE

LGP 989 (01) - Civil Rights Litigation

Civil Rights Litigation

Credits: 2.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 17429
This course focuses on litigation under 42 U.S.C. 1983 - the principal vehicle for civil rights claims prosecuted in the federal courts. The primary emphasis of the course is on the practical and procedural aspects of civil rights litigation, including matters such as standing, immunities, various issues relating to pleading and proof, the availability and choice of remedies, and the recovery of attorneys' fees. The course is designed to give students the practical skills required to effectively litigate civil rights claims in the federal courts while providing insight into the larger jurisprudential debate that has shaped the law in this area.
Instructors: Jordan Budd
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 W 1:00pm - 3:00pm UNHL 227

LIP 894 (01) - American Legal Process and Analysis I

Amer Legal Process&Analysis I

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 13405
This course introduces UNH Law graduate students to American common law and statutory legal reasoning, predictive legal writing, and American civil procedure. Through a combination of reading court documents, visiting court, lectures, group work, and written assignments, students will gain a working knowledge of the intersection of First Amendment law and Intellectual Property law. Students will also gain a working knowledge of American civil procedure. This will enhance the practical legal skills students need to think, write, and work effectively in their studies at UNH Law and in subsequent careers. The course is required for all students who do not hold a US JD degree. The course is also tailored for students whose first language is not American English, as well as those who are likely to pursue their legal careers outside the US. Credits: 3. Prerequisites: None. Grading: Writing exercises 70%, class preparation 20% and other (see syllabus) 10%.
Instructors: Jennifer Davis
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 MW 1:00pm - 2:30pm UNHL 201

LIP 912 (01) - Copyright Law

Copyright Law

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 17434
This course will introduce students to fundamental principles of U.S. copyright law. The legal protection of "creative" content as an intangible property right has been statutorily recognized in the U.S. for over 200 years. While legal rights in such works are often seen as rooted in economic rationale, the law has changed over time, in response to technological challenges and international developments. The course will therefore also provide students with an understanding of how U.S. copyright law functions and adapts in this changing environment. Students with an interest in any branch of modern intellectual property law and how it responds to modern challenges will benefit from this course. Eligibility: Open to all except 1Ls. Course format: lecture. Grading: final exam, 100%.
Instructors: Ann Bartow
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 TR 1:30pm - 3:00pm UNHL 274

LIP 912 (1ON) - Copyright Law

Copyright Law

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 17436
This course will introduce students to fundamental principles of U.S. copyright law. The legal protection of "creative" content as an intangible property right has been statutorily recognized in the U.S. for over 200 years. While legal rights in such works are often seen as rooted in economic rationale, the law has changed over time, in response to technological challenges and international developments. The course will therefore also provide students with an understanding of how U.S. copyright law functions and adapts in this changing environment. Students with an interest in any branch of modern intellectual property law and how it responds to modern challenges will benefit from this course. Eligibility: Open to all except 1Ls. Course format: lecture. Grading: final exam, 100%.
Instructors: Ann Bartow
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 Hours Arranged ONLINE

LIP 915 (01) - Entertainment Law

Entertainment Law

Credits: 2.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 17433
This course will address the legal and transactional issues involved with live performance, recording agreements, motion picture licensing, finance, and development, virtual entertainment of computer gaming and virtual worlds, and new media. Students will immerse themselves in the deal-making aspects of practice in the entertainment industry and the relationships between the media producers, distributors and artists in these industries. Eligibility: Open to all students. Course format: lecture. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course may be taken for an S/U grade.
Instructors: Alexandra J. Roberts
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 R 3:15pm - 5:15pm UNHL 202

LIP 944 (09) - Fundamentals of Intellectual Property

Fund of Intellectual Property

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   40  
CRN: 17439
S/U grading option not available for first-year students. But other students who have completed any course covering the substance of U.S. copyright, patent or trademark law may receive only S/U grades. Objectives: To introduce basic substantive requirements and procedures for obtaining, maintaining and enforcing patents, copyrights, trade secrets, trademarks and related subject matters such as rights of publicity and domain names. Description: Beyond the basics, the course explores underlying policy goals and conflicts among types of intellectual property, for example, the tension between patent and copyright protection or the tension between federal and state protection. It also considers goals and conflicts with other laws such as free speech. It also considers matters such as the extent to which various types of IP are "property," available remedies, sources of law, and responsibilities of the two main IP agencies as well as those of various courts. Eligibility: Open to all students. Course format: lecture. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course may be taken for an S/U grade.
Instructors: Megan Carpenter
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 Hours Arranged TBA

LIP 944 (1ON) - Fundamentals of Intellectual Property

Fund of Intellectual Property

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 13951
S/U grading option not available for first-year students. But other students who have completed any course covering the substance of U.S. copyright, patent or trademark law may receive only S/U grades. Objectives: To introduce basic substantive requirements and procedures for obtaining, maintaining and enforcing patents, copyrights, trade secrets, trademarks and related subject matters such as rights of publicity and domain names. Description: Beyond the basics, the course explores underlying policy goals and conflicts among types of intellectual property, for example, the tension between patent and copyright protection or the tension between federal and state protection. It also considers goals and conflicts with other laws such as free speech. It also considers matters such as the extent to which various types of IP are "property," available remedies, sources of law, and responsibilities of the two main IP agencies as well as those of various courts. Eligibility: Open to all students. Course format: lecture. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course may be taken for an S/U grade.
Attributes: Online (no campus visits), EUNH
Instructors: Jiarui Liu
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 Hours Arranged ONLINE