Timeroom: Fall 2019

Displaying 51 - 60 of 100 Results for: Campus = Law

LGP 933 (01) - Immigration Law

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 13952
Immigration law is complex and multi-faceted; it touches on other substantive areas of the law including constitutional law, criminal law and foreign policy. By the end of the semester students should be able to think critically about the historical, theoretical and constitutional context of immigration law, including division of immigration power between federal and state government as well as limits to the federal immigration power under the United States Constitution and the Amendments; possess a good understanding of the core principles of immigration law, its norms and practices; develop analytical skills to question and appraise immigration law policies and practices; identify current immigration issues in the United States, including analyzing the constitutionality and rationality of recent state and federal legislative enactments and proposals; and explore causes of present immigration problems and violations and what possible steps might Congress or states take to remedy flaws in current legislation on immigration. Eligibility: Open to 2Ls and 3Ls. Course format: lecture and problem based. Classroom attendance and participation are required. Grading: see syllabus. This course cannot be taken for an S/U grade.
Instructors: Enrique Mesa
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 T 5:30pm - 8:30pm UNHL 201

LGP 951 (01) - Professional Responsibility

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   55  
CRN: 13432
Professional Responsibility provides an in-depth study of the law of lawyering. The coverage includes the provisions of the Model Rules of Professional Conduct, bar admission, malpractice, and the "business of law," such as multijurisdictional practice, advertising, and practices with professionals from other disciplines. The course will also expose students to the criticism of the ethics of the legal profession and discuss the use of the adversarial system as the dominant model for our justice system. The course will use the problem-method as its primary vehicle to structure the discussion. Eligibility: Required JD course. Course enrollment is limited to 50 students. Course format: problem-based. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course cannot be taken for an S/U grade.
Instructors: Peter Scott
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 MW 8:30am - 10:00am UNHL 229

LGP 953 (01) - Remedies

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 13434
In this course students review the major kinds of relief clients can obtain in claims involving torts, contracts, property and other civil causes of action - all of which are tested on the bar exam. The course focuses on three majors kinds of remedies - damages, injunctions, and restitution - through readings, solving problems, and short writing assignments. Classes will be focused on solving problems through active team-based learning strategies. During the course students will show in writing and orally how lawyers solve problems in the area of remedies- what laws they use, how they apply them to new facts, and how they use those facts to make arguments to judges or juries. To successfully complete this course students will: 1. Analyze and synthesize primary and secondary authorities; 2. Solve legal problems; 3. Investigate facts, including developing and questioning inferences; 4. Make legal arguments; 5. Understand how to access and information related to remedies; 6. Think critically about law, policy and alternatives to legal remedies; 7. Draft legal documents that communicate clearly, are persuasive, and comply with applicable rules; 8. Learn the basic law and policy of remedies: damages, injunctions, and restitution; 9. Evaluate the advantages of pursuing different remedies to achieve clients' objectives; and 10. Participate professionally in class. Eligibility: Open to 2Ls and 3Ls. Prerequisites: First year required courses.. Course format: problem-based. This course is recommended for taking the bar exam. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course may be taken for an S/U grade.
Instructors: Sophie Sparrow
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 TF 10:00am - 11:30am UNHL 202

LGP 960 (01) - Torts

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   50  
CRN: 13436
Torts exposes you to the fundamentals of the major tort doctrines, focusing primarily on negligence and introducing intentional torts and products liability. Through reading primary authorities - cases and statutes - and secondary authorities such as the Restatement of Torts, jury instructions, and related materials, you will learn legal principles. Working on skills-based exercises, you will practice analyzing and applying torts principles to factual scenarios. During the course you will show in writing and orally how lawyers solve problems in the area of torts - what laws they use, how they apply them to new facts, and how they use those facts to make arguments to judges or juries. To successfully complete this course you will: 1. Analyze and synthesize cases; 2. Solve legal problems; 3. Investigate facts; 4. Make legal arguments; 5. Understand how to access information related to tort law; 6. Think critically about law, policy and the torts system; 7. Draft legal documents that communicate clearly, are persuasive, and comply with applicable rules; 8. Learn: A. The basic law and policy of torts: negligence, intentional torts and products liability; B. Which tort issues are decided by judges, which by juries (or judges sitting as fact finders); C. The interrelationship of different torts causes of actions; and 9. Participate professionally in class. Eligibility: Required JD course. Course format: problem-based. This course is recommended for taking the bar exam. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course cannot be taken for an S/U grade.
Instructors: Mitchell Simon
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 MW 10:30am - 12:00pm UNHL 229

LGP 960 (02) - Torts

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   50  
CRN: 13437
Torts exposes you to the fundamentals of the major tort doctrines, focusing primarily on negligence and introducing intentional torts and products liability. Through reading primary authorities - cases and statutes - and secondary authorities such as the Restatement of Torts, jury instructions, and related materials, you will learn legal principles. Working on skills-based exercises, you will practice analyzing and applying torts principles to factual scenarios. During the course you will show in writing and orally how lawyers solve problems in the area of torts - what laws they use, how they apply them to new facts, and how they use those facts to make arguments to judges or juries. To successfully complete this course you will: 1. Analyze and synthesize cases; 2. Solve legal problems; 3. Investigate facts; 4. Make legal arguments; 5. Understand how to access information related to tort law; 6. Think critically about law, policy and the torts system; 7. Draft legal documents that communicate clearly, are persuasive, and comply with applicable rules; 8. Learn: A. The basic law and policy of torts: negligence, intentional torts and products liability; B. Which tort issues are decided by judges, which by juries (or judges sitting as fact finders); C. The interrelationship of different torts causes of actions; and 9. Participate professionally in class. Eligibility: Required JD course. Course format: problem-based. This course is recommended for taking the bar exam. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course cannot be taken for an S/U grade.
Instructors: Sophie Sparrow
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 MW 1:00pm - 2:30pm UNHL 229

LGP 972 (01) - Valuation and the Law

Credits: 2.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   35  
CRN: 16012
Valuation is a prerequisite for thoughtful decision-making. The old management adage?you can?t manage what you don?t measure?remains true today. In business, sound decision-making involves placing reasonable values on assets and strategies to identify the best decisions among competing, but uncertain, choices. While valuation has long been used by businesses to improve decisions, it has been slow to develop as a wide-ranging decision tool in the legal setting. As a result, valuation principles are too often ignored or poorly implemented in legal settings. Valuation should be a fundamental skill possessed by most lawyers. Consider just a few of the legal settings that require valuation to make properly informed decisions: ? Developing remedies in the litigation context. ? Making sue-or-settle decisions. ? Crafting effective laws and regulations. ? Determining how much to spend on legal services. ? Developing and executing business strategies that are based on legal rights (such as intellectual property strategies). ? Evaluating the success or failure of negotiations. In each of these contexts, the decision-maker must make a value judgment (the option chosen is better than options not chosen), whether the decision-maker appreciates it or not. For example, when a client decides to settle a lawsuit, she has valued the settlement alternative higher than the litigation alternative. Therefore, the choice is not whether to employ a valuation analysis. Rather, the choice is whether to employ an intelligent valuation analysis that helps inform the decision or to employ a sloppy process that ignores such valuable information. One reason (and probably the most powerful reason) for the slow development of valuation analysis in the legal setting is the common misperception that valuation is too difficult. This course will seek to disprove that notion. This course will teach students how to apply valuation principles in their future legal practice and become more effective lawyers. Strong math skills are not required. We will not employ any mathematical concepts beyond what is required in a 6th grade math class.
Instructors: John Orcutt
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 R 9:00am - 11:00am UNHL 200

LGP 987 (1ON) - Int'l Business Transactions

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/15/2019 - 12/17/2019)
Class Size:   15  
CRN: 17505
International Business Transactions is a general course covering the fundamental issues that affect business in today?s global marketplace. Topics covered include legal issues associated with financing commercial transactions, transnational contracts, and foreign direct investment in countries abroad. The course will emphasize the role of international trade institutions, GATT treaties, and federal trade law.
Instructors: STAFF
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/15/2019 12/17/2019 Hours Arranged ONLINE

LGP 989 (01) - Civil Rights Litigation

Civil Rights Litigation

Credits: 2.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 17429
This course focuses on litigation under 42 U.S.C. 1983 - the principal vehicle for civil rights claims prosecuted in the federal courts. The primary emphasis of the course is on the practical and procedural aspects of civil rights litigation, including matters such as standing, immunities, various issues relating to pleading and proof, the availability and choice of remedies, and the recovery of attorneys' fees. The course is designed to give students the practical skills required to effectively litigate civil rights claims in the federal courts while providing insight into the larger jurisprudential debate that has shaped the law in this area.
Instructors: Jordan Budd
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 W 1:00pm - 3:00pm UNHL 227

LIP 801 (01) - Graduate Legal Research and Information Literacy

Grad Legal Rsrch&Info Literacy

Credits: 1.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 13403
This required one credit course introduces graduate students to the basic research tools and strategies a beginning intellectual property or commerce and technology professional needs to work in their practice area and engage in lifelong learning to keep their education current. The course focuses on: primary and secondary legal authority with lesser coverage on fact research, current awareness and practice tools and strategies; mandatory and persuasive authority; accessing, evaluating and updating secondary legal sources, court decisions, statutes and administrative rulemaking; developing a coherent research strategy including cost effective research; and appropriate choice of electronic formats. Students will be exposed to LEXIS, Westlaw and free web sites. At the end of the first semester students should be able to take a legal issue and determine the extent of legal information needed; access the needed legal information effectively and efficiently; evaluate legal information and its sources critically; incorporate the selected legal information into their understanding of the issue; understand the economic, legal and social issues surrounding the use of legal information; access and use information ethically and legally. Classes involve a mix of lecture, discussion and the opportunity to work directly with relevant print and electronic resources through assigned problems. In additional to a graded research midterm and final, students must successfully complete weekly research assignments. Eligibility: Graduate Students - required course. Prerequisites: none. Course format: skills training. Grading: final exam, 60%; class prep. and participation, 05%; regular submissions/quizzes, 35%.
Instructors: Thomas Hemstock
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 T 3:30pm - 4:30pm UNHL 201

LIP 855 (01) - Graduate Programs Contracts

Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall 2019 - Law (08/26/2019 - 12/06/2019)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 13404
In its simplest form, contract law deals with the world of legally enforceable agreements. The goal of this course is to introduce students to U.S. contract law, focusing primarily on the common law's approach to contract law. While U.C.C. Article II (sale of goods) is an important component of contract law and will be mentioned, it will not be a focus of the course. Eligibility: Open to international LL.M. students and students pursuing a master degree. Course format: lecture. This course is recommended for taking the bar exam. Grading: final exam, 100%. Course has an ungraded component or practicum. This course cannot be taken for an S/U grade.
Instructors: Stanley Kowalski
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/26/2019 12/6/2019 MWF 9:00am - 9:59am UNHL 227