HIST 440D (H01) - Honors/Citizens and Persons

Honors/Citizens and Persons

Durham   Liberal Arts :: History
Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2023 - Full Term (08/28/2023 - 12/11/2023)
Grade Mode: Letter Grading
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 15808
Definitions of citizenship have changed dramatically in the course of history. In this class, we will trace the evolution of expanding (and occasionally contracting) political and civil rights and responsibilities over time, with an emphasis on events in multicultural American nations and emphasizing how laws, social practices, unique historical contexts, and individuals? understanding of self and other have mutually produced each other. The course is part of the Honors Symposium ?Being Human? and will engage in an interdisciplinary conversation about personhood, humanity, rights and responsibilities, and dehumanization.
Registration Approval Required. Contact Instructor or Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Only the following students: Honors Program
Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc), Honors course
Instructors: Julia Rodriguez

Times & Locations

Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/28/2023 12/11/2023 TR 11:10am - 12:30pm HORT 422
Final Exam 12/13/2023 12/13/2023 W 3:30pm - 5:30pm HORT 422
Additional Course Details: 

HIST440D: Citizens and Persons  

This course is part of the HONR400 Honors Symposium “Being Human. 

 

ProfJulia Rodriguez, UNH History Department

 

The definition and substance of citizenship have changed dramatically in the course of history. Modern societies in particular have experienced struggles over who belongs to the nation, who deserves to protect it and be protected by it, as well as ideas about individual and group rights. These conflicts continue to the present day, as seen in the public debates over access to the ballot box, immigrant rights, marriage equality, inclusion of people with disabilities, the persistence of state violence against minorities, and other issues. 

 

In this class, we will trace the evolution of expanding (and occasionally contracting) political and civil rights and responsibilities over time; our exploration has a broad geographic scope, with an emphasis on events in multicultural American nations. Our approach emphasizes the history of ideas in action – how laws, institutions, social practices, unique historical contexts, and individuals’ understanding of self and other have mutually produced each other. 

 

Citizens and Persons is part of the Symposium “Being Human” and thus we will engage this semester in an interdisciplinary conversation exploring fundamental concepts such as: personhood, conceptions of humanity, definitions of rights and responsibilities, dehumanization. We will also discuss and assess a range of proposals for the amelioration of abuses and inequalities perpetuated in the past and present. 

 

  

Nari Ward, We the People (2017)